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RECONNAISSANCE-LEVEL 
ARCHITECTURAL SURVEY OF 
PROPERTIES IN FOGGY 
BOTTOM, WASHINGTON, D.C. 


DECEMBER 1999 


Prepared for: 

The George Washington University 

Office of Architecture, Engineering and Construction 

2025 F Street, N.W. 

Washington. D.C. 20052 


URS Greiner Woodward Clyde 

Woodward-Clyde Federal Services 
200 Orchard Ridge Road, Suite 101 
Gaithersburg, Maryland 20878 



Historical and Architectural Overview of Foggy Bottom Neighborhood, 
Washington, D.C. 


As Antoinette Lee noted in Buildings of the District of Columbia, Foggy 
Bottom’s origins can be traced to the 18 th century, when in 1765 Jacob Funk, a German 
immigrant, purchased a 130-acre tract of land and laid out the town of Hamburgh. 1 
While little came of Hamburgh, the area went through a series of signficant 
transformations in the 19 th and 20 th centuries that resulted in a wide array of building 
types and architectural expressions applied to residential, commercial, industrial, and 
educational land uses. 

Today, the Foggy Bottom area refers to a mixed-use district bordered generally by 
17 th Street to the east, Georgetown to the west, Pennsylvania Avenue to the north, and the 
Potomac River to the south. Within these boundaries are located the George Washington 
University, an historic residential district, several embassies, numerous apartment 
buildings, associations, hospitals, and businesses of all sizes. Because of the broad range 
of land uses, it is understandable that conflicts have developed from time to time among 
these diverse groups over land use and the somewhat eclectic group of buildings. Over 
the past three decades, in particular, concerns have been voiced primarily by area 
residents who have expressed concern that their neighborhood is being eroded as a result 
of overall neighborhood redevelopment. 2 Likewise, George Washington University also 
has concerns about development of its campus within this broader neighborhood, guided 
by its Master Plan, which embodies a commitment to provide the best possible facilities 
for its students to carry out the university’s expanding educational mission. Still other 
intermittent users of the area, who reach Foggy Bottom daily on one of the freeways that 
cut through the area, are also concerned about the future of this important area of the city. 

Of primary concern to these interest groups are the residential district and the 
University campus, both of which have rich histories firmly rooted in their contiguous 
and sometimes overlapping geographic location. These two concerns have grown up 
separately, but will mature together to take the Foggy Bottom and University areas into 
the next century. 

The residential neighborhood is formally recognized as the Foggy Bottom 
Historic District, which was listed in 1986 as a District of Columbia landmark, 3 and 
entered in the National Register of Historic Places, the nation’s list of properties 
significant in American history and culture, one year later. 4 The residences in the western 
end of Foggy Bottom are representative of this area’s 19 th century working class and 
immigrant history. The district began its life as one of Washington’s industrial hubs, 
active as a major shipping and warehousing center in the city. Later in the century, 

1 Scott. Pamela and Lee, Antoinette. Buildings of the District of Columbia. New York: Oxford University 
Press, 1993, p. 204. 

2 Personal communication with Professor Richard Longstreth, December 7, 1999. 

J Joint Committee of Landmarks of the National Capital, Fogg}’ Bottom Historic District Application Form, 
10/15/86. 

4 National Register of Historic Places. Fogg}- Bottom Historic District Nomination Form , 10/14/87. 



Historical and Architectural Overview of Foggy Bottom Neighborhood, 

Washington, D.C. 

As Antoinette Lee noted in Buildings of the District of Columbia, Foggy 
Bottom’s origins can be traced to the 1 8^ century, when in 1765 Jacob Funk, a German 
immigrant, purchased a 130-acre tract of land and laid out the town of Hamburgh. 1 
While little came of Hamburgh, the area went through a series of signficant 
transformations in the 19 lh and 20 th centuries that resulted in a wide array of building 
types and architectural expressions applied to residential, commercial, industrial, and 
educational land uses. 

Today, the Foggy Bottom area refers to a mixed-use district bordered generally by 
17 th Street to the east, Georgetown to the west, Pennsylvania Avenue to the north, and the 
Potomac River to the south. Within these boundaries are located the George Washington 
University, an historic residential district, several embassies, numerous apartment 
buildings, associations, hospitals, and businesses of all sizes. Because of the broad range 
of land uses, it is understandable that conflicts have developed from time to time among 
these diverse groups over land use and the somewhat eclectic group of buildings. Over 
the past three decades, in particular, concerns have been voiced primarily by area 
residents who have expressed concern that their neighborhood is being eroded as a result 
of overall neighborhood redevelopment. 2 Likewise, George Washington University also 
has concerns about development of its campus within this broader neighborhood, guided 
by its Master Plan, which embodies a commitment to provide the best possible facilities 
for its students to carry out the university’s expanding educational mission. Still other 
intermittent users of the area, who reach Foggy Bottom daily on one of the freeways that 
cut through the area, are also concerned about the future of this important area of the city. 

Of primary concern to these interest groups are the residential district and the 
University campus, both of which have rich histories firmly rooted in their contiguous 
and sometimes overlapping geographic location. These two concerns have grown up 
separately, but will mature together to take the Foggy Bottom and University areas into 
the next century. 

The residential neighborhood is formally recognized as the Foggy Bottom 
Historic District, which was listed in 1986 as a District of Columbia landmark, 3 4 and 
entered in the National Register of Historic Places, the nation’s list of properties 
significant in American history and culture, one year later. The residences in the western 
end of Foggy Bottom are representative of this area’s 19 th century working class and 
immigrant history. The district began its life as one of Washington’s industrial hubs, 
active as a major shipping and warehousing center in the city. Later in the century, 

1 Scott. Pamela and Lee, Antoinette. Buildings of the District of Columbia. New York: Oxford University 
Press, 1993, p. 204. 

2 Personal communication with Professor Richard Longstreth, December 7, 1999. 

3 Joint Committee of Landmarks of the National Capital, Fogg)’ Bottom Historic District Application Form , 
10 15/86. 

4 National Register of Historic Places, Foggy Bottom Histone District Nomination Form, 10/14/87. 



industries such as the Washington Gas and Light Company, two breweries, a fertilizer 
manufactory, and lime kilns were located here. (A map of the National Register district 
boundary is appended to this report.) 

The George Washington University, or Colombian College, as it was known then, 
was formed in 1812. At that time, it was located to the north of the city. The school 
moved to a site on H Street between 13 th and 15 th Streets in the early 1880s and then into 
Foggy Bottom proper beginning in 1912. At that time, the University bought or rented 
houses and small buildings that were easily converted into classrooms and offices. As 
one historian of the Foggy Bottom neighborhood notes, the University “fit well into the 
neighborhood as it took over the many attractive row houses which formerly had been 
modestly substantial homes.’ 0 

As the student population grew and University funds increased, several new 
buildings went up on campus between 1927 and 1959. GW was able to expand and 
consolidate with nine new buildings including Bell. Stuart, and Lisner Halls. 5 6 The 
George Washington campus continues to grow with buildings that serve both its students 
and the public. In 1948, with expansions in the 1970s, the George Washington 
University Hospital, one of the premiere teaching hospitals in the country, was built 
along Washington Circle and 23 rd Streets. 

The University has also invested in beneficial real estate ventures, including 
constructing office blocks, a shopping mall, and other facilities and renting out space. 7 8 
The facilities, particularly “The Shops at 2000 Penn' 7 support a retail economy in a 
building both old and new. 

Through reuse projects such as “The Shops at 2000 Penn.’’ the John Quincy 
Adams House, Stockton Hall, the Lenthall Houses, Woodhull and Underwood Houses, 
and numerous other historic buildings, the University has become a careful steward of 
many of the area's notable historic buildings. Although a number of historic buildings 
were removed to make way for new campus facilities, it is important to note that since 
1965. when the National Capital Planning Commission decided that the city's universities 

should curb spatial expansion, George Washington University has developed primarily 

8 * 

upwards rather than outwards. 

The incongruous nature of nine story buildings next to the older two and three 
story row houses may seem extreme, but it is just this upward expansion that allows the 
University to carry out the demands of a modern educational institution without 
developing further into the Foggy Bottom neighborhood. Given the already 
compromised nature of the area after the apartment construction boom from the 1930s 


5 Sherwood, Suzanne Bern,'. Fogg}' Bottom 1800-1975: A Stud}' in the Uses of an Urban Neighborhood. 

Washington DC: George Washington University, 1978. p. 39 
b Ibid. 

7 Scott and Lee, p. 214. 

8 Sherwood, p. 42. 



onward, the University's taller buildings do not seem so incompatible with the Foggy 
Bottom that has developed in the more recent decades of this century. 


Common Building Types of the Foggy Bottom and University Districts 
The Row House 

The many men and women needed to run the large scale industrial facilities in 
Foggy Bottom found housing in the surrounding area. During the last quarter of the 19 th 
century, row upon row of houses were constructed to house the mostly immigrant and 
African American labor force. They were modest in scale, providing simple brick 
dwellings with moderate decoration. The eastern end of Foggy Bottom, however, housed 
a more affluent population. Houses such as the Woodhull, Ringgold-Carroll, and 
Lenthall, as well as the several rows of houses turned into shops, restaurants, and campus 
facilities are still extant and in use in the eastern portion of Foggy Bottom. 

The urban vernacular architecture of the row house is well represented throughout 
the residential neighborhood, on the George Washington University campus, and through 
a smattering of small private businesses. These share a common vocabulary of form, 
style, materials, scale, and decoration. Their presence throughout the area creates a 
cohesiveness that links the Foggy Bottom and University districts with their common 
past. 


Recently constructed buildings on and off the George Washington University 
campus pay homage to the row house form in the use of similar materials, massing, scale, 
and architectural embellishments. The Support Building at 2025 F Street, the Jacob 
Bums Law Library at 716 20 lh Street, and Three Washington Circle were all designed on 
a small scale with articulated rooflines inspired by the row house. 

The Apartment Building 

Another ubiquitous building type found throughout the entire Foggy Bottom area 
is the apartment building. Beginning in the 1930s, large, mostly brick apartments sprang 
up across the city and in Foggy Bottom in particular. Like all D.C. buildings, they are 
limited in height, reaching to about eight or nine stories. Many were built with flat 
facades, their windows resting Hush with the exterior to create streamlined, upscale, 
Moderne buildings. Others are less sleek, but continue the use of brick, often tan or 
yellow in color, banks of windows, and decorated entrances. 

Two of the most notable expressions of redevelopment plans envisioned from the 
1940s are the Columbia Plaza and the Watergate Apartments. Columbia Plaza, designed 
in 1963 by Keyes, Lethbridge & Condon and located at 23 rd Street and Virginia Avenue, 
was originally envisioned as a ‘‘packaged living" ensemble with hotel, apartments, 
commerical plaza, and underground parking. q More significant was the Watergate, 


9 Scott and Lee. p. 212. 



designed by Luigi Moretti and Milton Fischer in 1963-1967, which used the ten acre 
industrial site on which massive gasworks were once located. Breaking from the usual 
development pattern, Moretti designed a series of curvilinear buildings that included 
apartments, a hotel, and office buildings, all placed within a landscape of gardens. 
Because of the size and scale of this complex, new standards for height and mass were 
put into place within this section of the neighborhood. 10 

On the University campus, other examples of fine apartment house design 
abound. These include the Statesman and several buildings that now house dormitories 
for the University, such as Schenley, Thurston, Onassis, Lafayette, Madison, and 
Mitchell Halls. Three exciting new projects include The St. James Suites at 950 24 th 
Street, the Dakota at 2100 F Street, and New Hall 2350 H Street. All are tall residential 
buildings designed in an imitative historical style. New Hall, completed in 1996, is 
especially interesting with its classic H-shape and brick fa9ade with concrete detailing, 
suggestive of stonework. 

International and National Organization Headquarters 

Several notable associations and organizations call Foggy Bottom “home.” 
Among them are the Pan American Health Organization, the World Health Organization, 
the World Bank and the International Monetary Fund, the American Red Cross, several 
embassies, and other smaller associations. The often significant architecture contributes 
to the Foggy Bottom area as a whole. The Pan Am/World Health Organization Building, 
for example, was built in 1964 as one of Washington’s most exciting architectural 
experiments. The Red Cross Building, currently undergoing renovation, has been a 
landmark in the area since its construction in the 1950s. The styles of these buildings 
differ, from the restrained 1930s American Foreign Sen ice Association to the ultra- 
modern Pan Am/World Health Organization building, but their designs add character to 
the area. 

High-Rise Commercial Buildings and Modern-Era Office Blocks 

The Foggy Bottom neighborhood and the campus area in particular are 
surrounded to the east and north by Washington’s Central Business District, with a 
particularly intense area of business activity centered along the Pennsylvania Avenue and 
K Street corridors. Beginning in the 1980s and continuing until today, many large office 
mega-blocks have been constructed to house modem office functions. These 
predominantly eight to ten story buildings employ modem materials, and are built using 
steel frames. They are primarily functional constructs and are nondescript 
architecturally. 


10 Scott and Lee. pp. 2 1 3-2 14 and Weeks. Christopher. A IA Guide to the Architecture of Washington. D C. 
Washington DC: Washington Chapter of the American Institute of Architects. 1994, p. 156. 



Conclusion 


Foggy Bottom has been described as a “neighborhood of schizophrenic 
sensations." 11 a “mishmash of buildings and highways,” 12 and is an area constantly in 
flux. It has been in a state of constant change since its early days as an industrial center, 
through the years of University’s development, through Urban Renewal and 
transportation changes in the 1950s and 1960s, and today, faced with the expansion of the 
Central Business District down Pennsylvania Avenue. 

The George Washington University campus acts as a buffer zone between the 
central business district to the north and east, and to residential and governmental areas to 
the south and west. 13 The University is itself a reflection of the myriad of forces that 
continue to shape Foggy Bottom. As with many urban college campuses across America, 
George Washington University’s buildings reflect a combination of historic buildings that 
have been adaptively reused to meet many of the University’s needs, as well as a series of 
new academic buildings that reflect major stylistic trends in architecture. As the 
University’s Master Plan notes, most buildings erected in the 1960s and 1970s reflect 
Modernist or Bauhaus forms that illustrated the “form follows function” aesthetic popular 
during the period. 14 During the 1980s, the University’s architectural palette changed, like 
much of the architecture in other sections of Washington. New university academic 
building construction placed a much greater emphasis on historical form, successfully 
employing historical design trends and features to better relate these buildings to 
historical models nearby. 

The University's campus historic preservation record is also worth noting. As 
part of its Master Plan, the University has placed emphasis on the preservation of historic 
buildings and structures that help it achieve its educational mission. Examples of this 
emphasis abound across campus, beginning with the continued use and careful care given 
to early buildings such as the Victorian rowhouses at 2142-2136 G Street, N.W., which 
now house Judaic Studies, the University Honors Program, and the University 
newspaper. Stockton Hall, constructed in 1924, is an excellent example the continued 
use of a larger Georgian Revival academic building that serves as the centerpiece of the 
Law School complex. Other academic buildings from the 1930s and 1940s also continue 
to serve academic and civic functions, including the School of Public Management/Hall 
of Government (constructed in the Streamlined Modeme style in 1938), and Lisner Hall 
at 2023 G Street (built in 1939, also in the Modeme style). Even 1950s academic 
buildings such as the Psychology Department at 2125 G Street, N.W. represent the 
preservation of other buildings of this era, with their broad geometric design, use of 
concrete and broad bands of windows. 


" Weeks, p. 146. 

12 Sherwood, p. 61 . 

! ’ The Campus Plan for the Year 1985 Through the Year 2000. Washington DC: George Washington 
University, 1986, p. 11. 

14 Campus Plan. p. 23-24 and personal conversation with Rob Hammell, December 3, 1999. 



Today, Foggy Bottom represents a rich, ever-changing mix of architectural styles 
and is essentially the product of many different periods of construction. George 
Washington University, as stated earlier, is reflective of the myriad forces which shaped 
the Foggy Bottom community in which it resides. Through careful implementation of the 
campus Master Plan, the University’s will continue to shape its campus to achieve its 
primary educational mission for the next century. Perhaps as importantly, the University 
will perform this work with respect to the architectural and historical form of its larger 
neighborhood, through the creation of new buildings that honor the University’s 
associations with Foggy Bottom and the city as at large. 



References 


The Campus Plan for the Year 1985 Through the Year 2000. Washington DC: George 
Washington University, 1986. 

District of Columbia Inventory of Historic Sites. Washington DC: Historic Preservation 
Division, 1995. 

Federal Writers’ Project of the WPA for the District of Columbia. The WPA Guide to 
Washington, D.C. New York: Pantheon Book, 1983. 

Goode, James, Best Addresses. Washington DC: Smithsonian Institution, 1988. 

Goode, James. Capital Losses. Washington DC: Smithsonian Institution, 1979. 

Joint Committee of Landmarks of the National Capital, Foggy Bottom Historic District 
Application Form, 10/15/86. 

National Register of Historic Places. Foggy Bottom Historic District Nomination Form, 
10/14/87. 

Scott, Pamela and Lee, Antoinette. Buildings of the District of Columbia. New York: 
Oxford University Press, 1993. 

Sherwood, Suzanne Berry. Foggy Bottom 1800-1975: A Study in the Uses of an Urban 
Neighborhood. Washington DC: George Washington University, 1978. 

Weeks. Christopher. ALA Guide to the Architecture of Washington, D.C. Washington 
DC: Washington Chapter of the American Institute of Architects, 1994. 




Survey Area 




















INVENTORY FORMS FOR SURVEYED PROPERTIES 



Architectural Survey of Properties in Foggy Bottom, Washington, D.C. 

Prepared by URS Greiner Woodward Clyde 
December 1999 



Name: 

Museum Studies Building 

Address: 

2035 F Street, NW 

Architect: 

Unknowm 

Date of Construction: 

Late 1 9 th century 

Campus ID: 

103-12 



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Description: 

This set of red brick row' houses is an 
example of the University’s reuse of extant 
neighborhood buildings. The highly 
articulated building has a hexagonal bay at 
one end and a Mission-style parapet gable at 
the other. It currently houses the Museum 
Studies offices and classrooms. 


Historic Designation: 

None 


References: 


Map Identifier/Reference: 

NCPC. 5770, D4 
Disk 6.1 






Architectural Survey of Properties in Foggy Bottom, Washington, D.C. 

Prepared by URS Greiner Woodward Clyde 
December 1999 



Name : 

Residence Hall 
Address: 

2031 F Street, NW 

Architect: 

Unknown 

Date of Construction: 

Early 20 th century 

Campus ID: 

103-8 



Description: 

This red brick residence hall displays the 
architectural style of the period. It has a flat 
facade with tripled windows. The center 
window of each set is capped by a keystone 
motif. A large wood cornice decorates the 
roofline. The building offers a good 
example of GW's stewardship of its historic 
properties. 


Historic Designation: 

None 


References: 


Map Identifier/Reference: 

NCPC. 5770. D4 
Disk 6.2 



Architectural Survey of Properties in Foggy Bottom, Washington, D.C. 

Prepared by URS Greiner Woodward Clyde 
December 1999 



Name: 

Facilities and Services Building 
Address: 

2025 F Street, NW 

Architect: 

Unknown 

Date of Construction: 

1980s- 1990s 

Campus ID: 

103-11 



Description: 

This recent construction closely mimics the 
historic Foggy Bottom row house in form 
and style. Built with a brick veneer, the 
banding with concrete and concrete window 
sills and lintels are meant to imitate stone. 
The stepped gables over each doorway are 
also inspired by historic forms. 


Historic Designation: 

None 


References: 


Man Identifier/Reference: 

NCPC 5770, D4 
Disk 6.3 




Architectural Survey of Properties in Foggy Bottom, Washington, D.C. 

Prepared by URS Greiner Woodward Clyde 
December 1999 



Name: 

Apartments 

Address: 

2000 F Street, NW 

Architect: 

Unknown 

Date of Construction: 

Unknown 

Campus ID: 

N/A 


Description: 

This 8-story tan brick building is 
representative of the apartment buildings 
found throughout Foggy Bottom. It relays 
an sense of Art Deco influence with its 
emphasis on verticality, with brick 
patterning decorating its articulated surface. 


Historic Designation: 

None 


References: 



Map Identifier/Reference: 

NCPC. 5770, D5 
Disk 6.5 




Architectural Survey of Properties in Foggy Bottom, Washington, D.C. 

Prepared by URS Greiner Woodward Clyde 
December 1999 



Name: 

The Steedman-Ray House/F Street Club 

Address: 

1925 F Street, NW 

Architect: 

Unknown 

Date of Construction: 

c. 1850 

Campus ID: 

121-6 


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Description: 

This Georgian brick building offers another 
example of the University’s reuse of extant 
buildings for campus facilities. This house 
was built around 1850 for Alexander Ray. 

In 1923 it was rented by the American 
University and became home to the F Street 
Club in the 1930s. Its symmetry, formality, 
and pedimented entrance fit well within the 
Georgian style of residential architecture. 


Historic Designation: 

DC Tandmark, 1 1/8/64 
National Register, 9/21/90 


References: 


Map Identifier/Reference: 

NCPC, 5770, D5 
Disk 6.6 





Architectural Survey of Properties in Foggy Bottom, Washington, D.C. 

Prepared by URS Greiner Woodward Clyde 
December 1999 



Name: 

The World Bank (rear view) 

Address: 

1919 F Street, NW 

Architect: 

Unknown 

Date of Construction: 

Unknown 

Campus ID: 

N/A 



Description: 

The World Bank occupies several buildings 
in the Central Business District just east of 
the GWU campus. This building conveys a 
horizontality despite its 8-story height. The 
alternate banding of black and white, 
achieved through the use of white stone 
veneer and black-tinted glass balconies, 
reinforces its horizontal emphasis. 


Historic Designation: 

None 


References: 


Map Idcntifier/Rcfercncc: 

NCPC. 5770. D5 
Disk 6.8 







Architectural Survey of Properties in Foggy Bottom, Washington, D.C. 

Prepared by URS Greiner Woodward Clyde 
December 1999 



Name : 

Francis Scott Key Hall 

Address: 

600 20 th Street, NW 

Architect: 

George N. Ray 

Date of Construction: 

1925 

Campus ID: 

1 03-9 



Description: 

This former hotel was built for Howard 
Etchison in 1 925 and purchased by the 
University in 1976. Although it was 
converted into a dormitory, it retains its 
original form and appearance. It is faced 
with brick and is eight stories tall with a 
cornice and exaggerated dentils. A 
limestone belt course runs over the second 
floor. 


Historic Designation: 

None 


References: 


Map Identificr/Reference: 

NCPC. 5770. D5 
Disk 6.9 







Architectural Survey of Properties in Foggy Bottom, Washington, D.C. 

Prepared by URS Greiner Woodward Clyde 
December 1999 



Name : 

Life Underwriters Association 

Address: 

1922 F Street, NW 

Architect: 

Unknown 

Date of Construction: 

Unknown 

Campus ID: 

N/A 


Description: 

This low-profile red brick building has a 
dramatic, classically-inspired entrance with 
thin Tuscan columns and a full entablature. 

It is formed by a central block of three 
stories with two flanking, slightly projecting 
wings. A broken pediment surmounts the 
door. 


Historic Designation: 

None 


References: 



Map Identifier/Reference: 

NCPC. 5770. D5 
Disk 6.10 








Architectural Survey of Properties in Foggy Bottom, Washington, D.C. 

Prepared by URS Greiner Woodward Clyde 
December 1999 



Name : 

President’s Office 

Address: 

2003 G Street, NW 

Architect: 

Victor Mendeleff 

Date of Construction: 

1892 

Campus ID: 

102-9 



Description: 

This red brick and sandstone row house was 
built in 1892. Typical of the more upscale 
dwellings in the eastern portion of Foggy 
Bottom, it is larger in scale and more 
decorated than the working class housing to 
the west. The round bays and rounded 
corner facing G and 20 th Streets, the dark red 
brick, and heavy massing add a Romanesque 
quality to the style. Molded and pressed 
brick decorate the window and door 
surrounds. 


Historic Designation: 

DC Landmark, 11/18/87 
National Register, 9/13/91 

References: 


Map Identifier/Reference: 

NCPC. 5770. D5 
Disk 6.12 



Architectural Surv ey of Properties in Foggy Bottom, Washington, D.C. 

Prepared by URS Greiner Woodward Clyde 
December 1999 




Map Identifier/Reference: 

NCPC. 5770. D5 
Disk 6. 13 


Name: 

Underwood House 

Address: 

2000 G Street, NW 

Architect: 

Unknown 

Date of Construction: 

c. 1870s 

Campus ID: 

103-7 

Description: 

This 214 story row house residence is 
constructed of brick and has a mansard roof. 
Designated as a National Historic Landmark, 
the most prestigious honor for an historic 
structure in the United States, the 
Underwood house was home to Oscar 
Underwood from 1914-25. The house is 
Second Empire in style w ith its roof form 
and stone window hoods. A U.S. 
Representative. Underwood is best known 
for authoring the Underwood-Simmons 
Tariff in 1913 and for his candidacy for the 
Presidency in 1912. 

Historic Designation: 

DC Landmark, 3/3/79 
National Register, 12/8/76 
National Historic Landmark, 12/8/76 

References: 



Architectural Survey of Properties in Foggy' Bottom, Washington, D.C. 

Prepared by URS Greiner Woodward Clyde 
December 1999 



Name: 

Gilbert Stuart Hall 
Address: 

2013 G Street, NW 

Architect: 

Edwin Weihe and Robert Barnes 

Date of Construction: 

1936 

Campus ID: 

102-10 


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Description: 

When it was designed in 1936, this 4-story' 
plus basement classroom building was built 
to house the Social Sciences department. It 
is constructed of reinforced concrete with a 
red brick exterior, slate sills, and metal 
windows. Its style is reminiscent of Bauhaus 
architecture. Paired with its mate across the 
quad. Bell Hall, and the later Lisner Hall, 
these University buildings contribute 
significantly to the city’s high style 1930s 
architecture. 


Historic Designation: 

None 


References: 

GWU Building Summary Sheet 


Map Identifier/Reference: 

NCPC, 5770. D4 
Disk 6.14 



Architectural Survey of Properties in Foggy Bottom, Washington, D.C. 

Prepared by URS Greiner Woodward Clyde 
December 1999 



Name : 

Lisner Hall 

Address: 

2023 G Street, NW 

Architect: 

Waldron Faulkner 

Date of Construction: 

1939 

Campus ID: 

102-11 



Description: 

Lisner Hall was built in 1939 to complete 
quad buildings, along with Bell and Stuart 
Halls. These three present a cohesive set of 
1930s institutional architecture. Lisner was 
the first building on campus devoted 
completely to library use. GWU Director of 
Libraries. Russell Mason, aided the 
architects to ensure the form of the building 
followed its purpose. 


Historic Designation: 

None 


References: 


Map Identifier/Reference: 

NCPC. 5770. D4 
Disk 6. 1 5 





Architectural Survey of Properties in Foggy Bottom, Washington, D.C 

Prepared by URS Greiner Woodward Clyde 
December 1999 


Name 


Address 


Architect: 

Edwin Weihe and Robert Bames 


Date of Construction 

1934 


Description: 

This four-story building has little 
ornamentation and very rectilinear lines, 
typical of the Bauhaus style. It was designed 
to match Stuart Hall for use as a classroom 
building. It is four stories tall plus a 
basement and is constructed of reinforced 
concrete. The exterior is faced with brick 
with slate sills and aluminum windows. 


Historic Desienation 

None 


References 


GWU Building Summary Sheet 


Map Identifier/Reference 


NCPC. 5770. D4 
Disk 6. 1 7 



Architectural Survey of Properties in Foggy Bottom, Washington, D.C. 

Prepared by URS Greiner Woodward Clyde 
December 1999 



Name : 

Woodhull House 

Address: 

2033 G Street, NW 

Architect: 

Unknown 

Date of Construction: 

1855 

Campus ID: 

102-13 



Description: 

This 2-story Italianate mansion of brick 
construction has heavy projecting cornices 
and semi-hexagonal oriels. This house 
commemorates the movement of the 
University to its present location and is a 
symbol of the changing nature of the 
neighborhood, from residential to university 
campus. It now serves as the University 
Police Station. 


Historic Designation: 

DC Landmark, 1 1/18/87 
A/4'oai! (Ste, Filty) 

References: 


Map Identifier/Reference: 

NCPC, 5770, D4 
Disk 6. 18 




Architectural Survey of Properties in Foggy Bottom, Washington, D.C. 

Prepared by URS Greiner Woodward Clyde 
December 1999 



Name: 

Program Project Management 

Address: 

2101 F Street, NW 

Architect: 

Unknown 

Date of Construction: 

Late 19 lh -early 20 th century 

Campus ID: 

80-29 



Description: 

This former apartment building is three 
stories tall with a raised basement. It is 
constructed of brick with two square 
projecting bays and a large cornice. A 
segmental arch spans the recessed entryway. 


Historic Designation: 

None 


References: 


Map Identifier/Reference: 

NCPC. 5770. D4 
Disk 7.1 




Architectural Survey of Properties in Foggy Bottom, Washington, D.C. 

Prepared by URS Greiner Woodward Clyde 
December 1999 



Name : 

Phi Sigma Kappa House 

Address: 

603 21 st Street, NW 

Architect: 

Unknown 

Date of Construction: 

Late 1 9 th century 

Campus ID: 

80-22 



Description: 

Typical of the more opulent row houses of 
eastern Foggy Bottom, this residence is 
made of brick with an elaborate exterior 
form and detailing. It has an octagonal 
comer turret, capped with a tent roof, a 3- 
sided bay, and a Flemish-style parapet. The 
deep red brick is offset by the use of 
limestone for detailing, such as the water 
table, parapet coping, and for lintels and 
sills. 


Historic Designation: 

None 


References: 


Map Identifier/Reference: 

NCPC, 5770. D4 
Disk 7.2 





Architectural Survey of Properties in Foggy Bottom, Washington, D.C. 

Prepared by URS Greiner Woodward Clyde 
December 1999 



Name : 

Lenthall Houses 

Address: 

606-610 21 st Street, NW 

Architect: 

John Lenthall 

Date of Construction: 

c. 1800 

Campus ID: 

80-19 and 80-20 



Map Identifier/Reference: 

NCPC, 5770. D4 
Disk 7.3 


Description: 

These adjoining houses are two of the oldest 
buildings in the city. They were designed 
and built by John Lenthall, principal 
assistant to Benjamin Latrobe on the 
construction of the U.S. Capitol. They are 
Federal style buildings constructed of red 
brick. Two small dormers. pierce the 
roofline and wood frames with cornices 
surround the doors. The buildings were 
originally located on 19 Ih Street, but were 
moved and restored in 1978-1979, during a 
University construction project. They now 
serve as campus residences. 

Historic Designation: 

DC Landmark, 1 1/8/64 
National Register, 3/16/72 

References: 

Buildings of DC, p.215-216 



Architectural Survey of Properties in Fogg)' Bottom, Washington, D.C. 

Prepared by URS Greiner Woodward Clyde 
December 1999 



Name : 

Hattie Strong Hall 
Address: 

620 21 st Street, NW 

Architect: 

A.B. Trowbridge and Waldron Faulkner 

Date of Construction: 

1934-6 

Campus ID: 

80-10 



Description: 

This building was the first residence hall 
built by the University. It is a 6-story 
Georgian Revival dormitory with a deck and 
solarium located on the roof. It is 
constructed of reinforced concrete with brick 
facing and limestone details. A belt course 
runs above the first floor and the top floor is 
decorated by arched windows. 


Historic Designation: 

DC Landmark, 1 1/18/87 
National Register, 4/12/91 

References: 

GWU Building Summary Sheet 


Map Identifier/Reference: 

NCPC, 5770. D4 
Disk 7.4 




Architectural Survey of Properties in Foggy Bottom, Washington, D.C. 

Prepared by URS Greiner Woodward Clyde 
December 1999 



Name : 

Row Houses 

Address: 

605-609 2 1 st Street. NW 

Architect: 

Unknow'n 

Date of Construction: 

Late 19 th century 

Campus ID: 

103-15 and 103-16 


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dEK 

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m 



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□ 

( 

RED CROSS 


Description: 

Indicative of GW's stewardship of some of 
its older properties, these brick row houses 
are now used by various University 
departments. These former residences have 
mansard roofs with two small dormers. The 
two at the ends are notable for their Flemish- 
style parapets. All contain arched doorways 
with a small arched window above. 


Historic Designation: 

None 


References: 


Map IdentifierTReference: 

NCPC. 5770. D4 
Disk 7.5 








Architectural Survey of Properties in Foggy Bottom, Washington, D.C. 

Prepared by URS Greiner Woodward Clyde 
December 1999 



Name : 

Quigley's Pharmacy Building 

Address: 

619 21 s ' Street, NW 

Architect: 

Unknown 

Date of Construction: 

Late lO^-early 20 th century 

Campus ID: 

103-10 



Description: 

Originally a pharmacy with a soda counter 
and tables, this building now houses the 
Geography Department. Constructed of 
brick with limestone details, the building has 
an octagonal bay at the comer marking its 
original entrance. A 3-sided bay articulates 
the west facade and a belt course runs above 
the second story of this 3-storv building. 


Historic Designation: 

None 

References: 


Map Identifier/Reference: 

NCPC, 5770. D4 
Disk 7.6 





Architectural Survey of Properties in Foggy Bottom, Washington, D.C. 

Prepared by URS Greiner Woodward Clyde 
December 1999 



Name : 

Hall of Government 
Address: 

710 21 s ’ Street, NW 

Architect: 

Waldron Faulkner 

Date of Construction: 

1938 

Campus ID: 

79-9 



Description: 

This building is in keeping with character of 
University buildings of the time period and 
exhibits Art Deco influences. It is 
constructed of reinforced concrete with a 
limestone veneer. The flat fa<;ade is broken 
by columns of windows separated by metal 
panels. 


Historic Designation: 

None 

References: 

GWU Building Summary Sheet 


Map Identifier/Reference: 

NCPC, 5770. D4 
Disk 7.7 



Architectural Survey of Properties in Foggy Bottom, Washington, D.C. 

Prepared by URS Greiner Woodward Clyde 
December 1 999 



Name : 

Alumni House 
(Margaret Wetzel House) 

Address: 

714 21 st Street, NW 

Architect: 

Unknown 

Date of Construction: 

c. 1855 

Campus ID: 

79-8 


Description: 

This 3-story brick Italianate building reflects 
the past residential feel of this neighborhood. 
It also retains Greek Revival influences and 
is constructed of brick, with stone details. 
The house was built as a residence for 
Margaret Wetzel in the mid- 1 850s. The 
University acquired it in 1931 to serve as the 
Faculty Club. It now houses the Alumni 
office. 


Historic Designation: 

DC Landmark, 11/18/87 
National Register, 10/25/90 

References: 



Map Identifier/Reference: 

NCPC, 5771, A4 
Disk 7.8 



Architectural Survey of Properties in Foggy Bottom, Washington, D.C. 

Prepared by URS Greiner Woodward Clyde 
December 1 999 



Name : 

Lisner Auditorium 
Address: 

730 21 st Street, NW 

Architect: 

Faulkner & Kingsbury 

Date of Construction: 

1941-1943 

Campus ID: 

79-5 



Description: 

This building has a very spare design, and is 
an example of the restrained architecture of 
the late 1 930s and 1 940s. The theatre is 
faced with limestone and marble and has an 
abstract classicism to it, evident in the highly 
stylized colonnade along the north facade. 


Historic Designation: 

DC Landmark, 1 1/18/87 
National Register, 1 0/25/90 

References: 

GWU Building Summary Sheet 


Map Identifier/Reference: 

NCPC, 5771. A4 
Disk 7.9 





Architectural Surv ey of Properties in Foggy Bottom, Washington, D.C. 

Prepared by URS Greiner Woodward Clyde 
December 1999 



Name: 

Corcoran Hall 

Address: 

725 21 st Street, NW 

Architect: 

Albert L. Harris and Arthur B. Heaton 

Date of Construction: 

1924 

Campus ID: 

102-1 



Description: 

This 4-story structure was built to 
complement Stockton Hall, across the quad. 
It is constructed of concrete and steel 
framing faced with brick and limestone. It 
has a rectangular floor plan and exhibits a 
symmetrical form, regular window spacing, 
and a restrained entryway. A cupola with 
windows adorns the roof. 


Historic Designation: 

DC Landmark, 11/18/87 

/14f)d/tv( i Vtyfar (stz i fr(&) 

References: 

GWU Building Summary Sheet 


Map Identifier/Reference: 

NCPC, 5771, A4 
Disk 7.10 







Architectural Survey of Properties in Foggy Bottom, Washington, D.C. 

Prepared by URS Greiner Woodward Clyde 
December 1999 



Name : 

Gewir/z Hillel Center 

Ctu/i r z- 

Address: 

Comer of 23 rd and H 

Architect: 

Unknown 

Date of Construction: 

1986 

Campus ID: 

42 



Description: 

The 3 -story plus basement Postmodern 
Gew'irz Hillel Center is faced w'ith red brick 
and detailed with concrete elements, such as 
the fenestration framing. The comer on the 
building, facing H and 23 rd Streets, is glass. 
A small semicircular window and brick arch 
decorate the second story window on the 
east facade. 


Historic Designation: 

None 


References: 


Map Identifier/Reference: 

NCPC. 5771. A3 
Disk 7.11 




Architectural Survey of Properties in Foggy Bottom, Washington, D.C. 

Prepared by URS Greiner Woodward Clyde 
December 1999 



Name: 

University Parking Garage 

Address: 

2211 H Street, NW 

Architect: 

Mills Petticord & Mills 

Date of Construction: 

1972 

Campus ID: 

55-6 



Description: 

This utilitarian structure dominates the 
block. It has space for over 1000 cars on 12 
levels, three of which are below ground. It 
is constructed of reinforced concrete slabs on 
a concrete caisson foundation. 


Historic Designation: 

None 

References: 

GWU Building Summary Sheet 


Man Identifier/Reference: 

NCPC, 5771. A3 
Disk 7.13 




Architectural Survey of Properties in Foggy Bottom, Washington, D.C. 

Prepared by URS Greiner Woodward Clyde 
December 1999 



Name : 

Melvin Gelman Library 
Address: 

2130 II Street, NW 

Architect: 

Mills, Petticord & Mills 

Date of Construction: 

1973 

Campus ID: 

79-2 



Description: 

The modem Gelman Library is a 7-story 
building with a basement, constructed of 
concrete. The facade is largely punctuated 
by windows, which are divided by projecting 
vertical slabs. The side elevations (east and 
west) are windowless. 


Historic Designation: 

None 


References: 

GWLI Building Summary Sheet 


Map Identifier/Reference: 

NCPC. 5771. A4 
Disk 7.15 



Architectural Survey of Properties in Foggy Bottom, Washington, D.C. 

Prepared by URS Greiner Woodward Clyde 
December 1999 


Name: 

Smith Hall of Art 



Address: 

801 22 nd Street, NW 

Architect: 

Unknown 

Date of Construction: 

1982 

Campus ID: 

77 



Description: 

The modem Smith Hall of Art is faced with 
tan brick. Details include a metal balustrade 
along its multilevel roof and concrete piers 
supporting the roof over covered balconies. 
The building is attached to the Academic 
Center (Philips Hall). 


Historic Designation: 

None 


References: 


Map Identifier/Reference: 

NCPC, 5771. A4 
Disk 7. 14 



Architectural Survey of Properties in Foggy Bottom, Washington, D.C. 

Prepared by URS Greiner Woodward Clyde 
December 1999 



Name: 

Madison Hall 
Address: 

736 22 nd Street, NW 

Architect: 

Unknown 

Date of Construction: 

1920s 

Campus ID: 

56-3 



Description: 

Like the historically significant Francis Scott 
Key Hall, Madison Hall was converted to 
dormitory use. This building was originally 
built as the Flagler Apartments. The 
University has other significant large 
campus residences in addition to Key and 
Madison Halls, including Onassis, Thurston. 
Munson, and Lafayette Halls. These 
buildings are representative of apartment 
houses form the late 1 920s through the 
1940s and the university's interest in reusing 
them as dormitories. 


Historic Designation: 

None 


References: 


Map Identifier/Reference: 

NCPC 5771. A3 
Disk 7. 16 




Architectural Survey of Properties in Foggy Bottom, Washington, D.C. 

Prepared by URS Greiner Woodward Clyde 
December 1999 



Name: 

Cloyd Heck Marvin Center 
Address: 

800 21 st Street, NW 

Architect: 

Mills, Petticord & Mills 

Date of Construction: 

1968-70 

Campus ID: 

77-6 



Description: 

The large Cloyd Heck Marvin Center was 
opened in 1970 and is named after long-time 
University President Marvin. The building 
is bipartite, with one half serving as a 
student center with eateries and parking. 

The other half is comprised of the Dorothy 
Betts Marvin Theatre, with seating for 380 
people. 


Historic Designation: 

None 


References: 

GWU Building Summary Sheet 


Map Identifier/Reference: 

NCPC. 5771. A4 
Disk 7.19:8.1 



Architectural Survey of Properties in Foggy Bottom, Washington, D.C. 

Prepared by URS Greiner Woodward Clyde 
December 1999 



Name: 

Schenley Hall 
Address: 

.2121 H Street, NW 

Architect: 

Unknown 

Date of Construction: 

1920s 

Campus ID: 

77-12 



Description: 

Like Thurston, Onassis, Munson, and 
Lafayette Halls, Schenley is another example 
of the university converting an historic 
apartment building into a dormitory. 

Schenley is eight stories tall with a brick and 
stone edifice. Two 3-sided bays project out 
from the facade. Stone veneer encases the 
first two floors, with a wide frieze at the top. 
A stone belt course runs over the sixth floor. 
A stone shield, ornamental swags and a large 
fanlight grace the front entrance. 


Historic Designation: 

None 

References: 


Map Identifier/Reference: 

NCPC, 5771, A4 
Disk 7.20 



Architectural Survey of Properties in Foggy Bottom, Washington, D.C. 

Prepared by URS Greiner Woodward Clyde 
December 1999 



Name: 

Samson Hall/ Forensic Sciences 

Address: 

2036 H Street, NW 

Architect: 

Norris Crandall 

Date of Construction: 

1930, second story in 1939 

Campus ID: 

102-2 



Description: 

This building is simple in design and has 
little ornamentation. Subtle variations in the 
brickwork, however, add some visual 
interest, notably the recessed panels and 
arches, rustication between the second and 
third levels, a molded brick water table, and 
a belt course under the third level window. 
The building was constructed in 1930 as a 
one story Mechanical Engineering 
Laboratory. A second floor was added in 
1939. 

Historic Designation: 

None 


References: 


Map Identifier/Reference: 

NCPC. 5771, A4 
Disk 8.3 




Architectural Survey of Properties in Foggy Bottom, Washington, D.C. 

Prepared by URS Greiner Woodward Clyde 
December 1999 



Name: 

Houses 

Address: 

2021 and 2013 H Street, NW 

Architect: 

Unknown 

Date of Construction: 

Late 19 th -early 20 th century 

Campus ID: 

N/A 



Description: 

The juxtaposition of these two isolated row 
house end units and the large office building 
in the background characterizes the whole of 
the Foggy Bottom/ GWU area. The contrast 
between old a new is sharp here, with the 
residences confirming the former residential 
nature of the district. 


Historic Designation: 

None 


References: 


Map Identifier/Reference: 

NCPC, 5771. A4 
Disk 8.8 




Architectural Surv ey of Properties in Foggy Bottom, Washington, D.C. 

Prepared by URS Greiner Woodward Clyde 
December 1999 




Name: 

School of Media and Public Affairs 
(Union Methodist Episcopal Church and 
Rectory) 

Address: 

812-14 20th Street, NW 

Architect: 

Unknown 

Date of Construction: 

c. 1900 

Campus ID: 

Unknown 

Description: 

The former Union Methodist Episcopal 
Church is a admirable example of GW’s 
commitment to building reuse. Rather than 
construct a new building, the campus leases 
classroom space for its School of Media and 
Public Affairs here. The church and 
ad joining rectory are constructed of brick, 
which has been parged with beige colored 
concrete. This light color and the red tile 
roof give the buildings a Mediterranean 
style. 


Historic Designation: 

None 


References: 


Man Identifier/Reference: 

NCPC 5771, A5 
Disk 4.1. 2 




Architectural Survey of Properties in Foggy Bottom, Washington, D.C. 

Prepared by URS Greiner Woodward Clyde 
December 1999 



Name: 

Shops at 2000 Penn/Red Lion Row 
Address: 

2000-2040 Pennsylvania Avenue 

Architect: 

Unknown 

Date of Construction: 

1831-96 

Addition/Renovation in 1980-81 

Campus ID: 

101-29 



Description: 

The unusual “Shops at 2000 Penn” is a 
shopping center built behind the facades of 
an historic row of houses and stores along 
Eye Street between 19 lh and 20 th Streets. 

The historic buildings were joined together 
and some of their original materials retained 
during the construction of the shops and the 
attendant 8-story office building that rises 
from the rear. The facades display materials, 
forms, and details characteristic of late 19 th 
century residential and commercial 
architecture. 

Historic Designation: 

DC Landmark 1/24/77 
National Register 8/9/77 

References: 


Map Identifier/Reference: 

NCPC 5771. A4 and A5 
Disk 4.4-8 



Architectural Survey of Properties in Foggy Bottom, Washington, D.C. 

Prepared by URS Greiner Woodward Clyde 
December 1 999 



Name: 

Office Building 
Address: 

2121 Pennsylvania Avenue, NW 

Architect: 

Unknown 

Date of Construction: 

Unknown 

Campus ID: 

N/A 



Description: 

This recently constructed office building 
represents the expansion of the Central 
Business Area down the Pennsylvania 
Avenue corridor. The building is located 
just outside of the campus and brings a 
metropolitan atmosphere to the area. Its 
curved comer and overhanging cornice give 
a slightly Italianate flair to its modem 
edifice. 


Historic Designation: 

None 


References: 


Mao Identifier/Reference: 

NCPC 5771, B4 
Disk 4.9 




Architectural Surv ey of Properties in Foggy Bottom, Washington, D.C. 

Prepared by URS Greiner Woodward Clyde 
December 1999 



Name: 

Office Building 

Address: 

2100 Pennsylvania Avenue, NW 

Architect: 

Unknown 

Date of Construction: 

Unknown 

Campus ID: 

75-5 

Description: 

This modem building is imposing in its size 
and materials. It is constructed of concrete 
with mauve metal detailing and is eight 
stories tall with square windows. It is an 
example of the university's real estate 
holdings that are leased out as office space. 


Historic Designation: 

None 


References: 


Map Identifier/Reference: 

NCPC 5771. A4 
Disk 4.10 


Architectural Survey of Properties in Foggy Bottom, Washington, D.C. 

Prepared by URS Greiner Woodward Clyde 
December 1999 




Name: 

George Washington University Medical 
Center Ambulatory Care 

Address: 

2150 Pennsylvania Avenue, NW 

Architect: 

Unknown 

Date of Construction: 

1920s-l 930s 

Campus ID: 

75-2 

Description: 

This building is similar in massing and 
details to Onassis and Munson Halls. It is a 
12-story building, probably a former 
apartment house. It is faced with brick and 
cast stone and has Deco-inspired detailing. 
Metal panels with pressed scrollwork 
decorate the areas below the windows. A 
similar motif surrounds the door. 


Historic Designation: 

None 


References: 


Map Identifier/Reference: 

NCPC 5771. B4 
Disk 4.12 


Architectural Survey of Properties in Foggy Bottom, Washington, D.C. 

Prepared by URS Greiner Woodward Clyde 
December 1999 



Name: 

Row of Commercial Buildings 
Address: 

2134-42 Pennsylvania Avenue, NW 

Architect: 

Unknown 

Date of Construction: 

1 9 th century 

Camp u s ID: 

75-3, 75-17, 75-18, 75-19, 75-20, 75-21 



Description: 

This row of historic commercial buildings is 
located between two larger, more recent 
buildings. The buildings house various 
campus offices and create a good example of 
how the university has reused historic 
buildings to house its offices. These 
buildings are typical of commercial 
architecture of the day and remain 
remarkably intact. They are three stories 
over an elevated basement. Cornices with 
dentils elaborate window treatments, and 
arches over fenestration decorate them. 

Historic Designation: 

None 

References: 


Map Identifier / Referenc e: 

NCPC 5771, A4 
Disk 4.13 




/ :V! 


Architectural Survey of Properties in Foggy Bottom, Washington, D.C. 

Prepared by URS Greiner Woodward Clyde 
December 1999 



Name: 

Row Houses 

Address: 

2207-2213 Pennsylvania Avenue, NW 

Architect: 

Unknown 

Date of Construction: 

Late 19 th century 

Campus ID: 

N/A 



Description: 

These intact row houses are located on 
Washington Circle and evoke the upscale 
residences that once filled this area. The 
houses are faced with brick and have stone 
foundations, lintels, sills, and belt courses. 
The two interior buildings have square bays, 
while the two on the ends have round turrets. 
The buildings are still used as private 
residences. 


Historic Designation: 

None 


References: 


Map Identifier/Reference: 

NCPC 5771, B3 
Disk 4.14 



Architectural Survey of Properties in Foggy Bottom, Washington, D.C. 

Prepared by URS Greiner Woodward Clyde 
December 1999 



Name: 

Offices 

Address: 

Three Washington Circle 

Architect: 

Unknown 

Date of Construction: 

Unknown 

Campus ID: 

N/A 



Description: 

These modem row houses present an 
excellent example of designing new 
buildings to be compatible with the historic 
surrounding neighborhood. They were 
constructed with row house form, massing, 
and style in mind. Their brick walls and 
turret on the comer building mimic other 
row houses on Washington Circle. 


Historic Designation: 

None 


References: 


Map Identifier/Reference: 

NCPC 5771, B3 
Disk 4.15 



Architectural Survey of Properties in Foggy Bottom, Washington, D.C. 

Prepared by URS Greiner Woodward Clyde 
December 1999 



Name: 

Offices and the Embassy of Spain 

Address: 

23 1 9-75 Pennsylvania Avenue, N W 

Architect: 

Unknown 

Date of Construction: 

Unknown 

Campus ID: 

N/A 



Description: 

These adjoining townhouses contain offices 
and the Embassy of Spain. The buildings 
were interconnected and a secondary office 
structure was added on top of the row 
houses. The modem addition contains 
elements of the historic architecture below in 
terms of decorative shapes, but in materials 
and size, it is incompatible with the small 
scale architecture of the area. 


Historic Designation: 

None 


References: 


Map Identifier/Reference: 

NCPC 5771. B3 
Disk 4. 16. 17 




Architectural Survey of Properties in Foggy Bottom, Washington, D.C. 

Prepared by URS Greiner Woodward Clyde 
December 1999 



Name: 

Penn House Apartments 

Address: 

2400 Pennsylvania Avenue, NW 

Architect: 

Unknown 

Date of Construction: 

1950s- 1960s 

Campus ID: 

N/A 



Description: 

This apartment building is eight stories tall 
faced with 6-course American bond beige 
brick. The windows are flush with the wall 
surface making the facade one continuous 
flat plane. The building is representative of 
many of the apartment buildings of the 
1950s and 1960s surrounding the GWU 
campus. 


Historic Designation: 

None 


References: 


Map Identifier/Reference: 

NCPC 5771, B3 
Disk 4.18 



l&LI 


Architectural Survey of Properties in Foggy Bottom, Washington, D.C. 

Prepared by URS Greiner Woodward Clyde 
December 1999 




Name : 

Office Building 

Address: 

1800 G Street, NW 

Architect : 

Unknown 

Date of Construction: 

1960s- 1970s 

Campus ID: 

N/A 

Description: 

This modem office block was probably 
constructed in the late 1960s or early 1970s. 
It is concrete with large aggregate pebbles. 
The building rises 10 stories in height above 
a garage. It sits on concrete piers, but is not 
open underneath because of the garage 
entrance. 


Historic Designation: 

None 


References: 


Map Id entifier /Refer ence: 

NCPC 5770. D5 
Disk 3.1 


Architectural Survey of Properties in Foggy Bottom, Washington, D.C. 

Prepared by URS Greiner Woodward Clyde 
December 1999 



Name : 

Ringgold-Carroll House 
(Dacor-Bacon House) 

Address: 

1801 F Street, NW 

Architect : 

Architect unknown 
Tench Ringgold, Builder 

Date of Construction: 

c. 1825 

Additions in c. 1860, 1911, 1985 


Campus ID: 

N/A 



Description: 

Tench Ringgold designed his house in one of 
Washington’s more prominent 
neighborhoods in the early 1 9 th century. 
Located near the prestigious Lafayette 
Square, this residence was originally only 
two stories tall. In the 20 lh century, the 
notable Washington hostess, the Countess of 
Yarmouth, enlarged the building and added 
the current entrance to meet her entertaining 
needs. It is one of the few remaining houses 
in an area dominated by large government 
buildings and modem office blocks. 

Historic Designation: 

DC Landmark, 11/8/64 
National Register, 7/26/73 
References: 

AIA Guide, p. 148 


Map Identif ier /Ref erence: 

NCPC 5770. D5 
Disk 3.2 




Architectural Survey of Properties in Foggy Bottom, Washington, D.C. 

Prepared by URS Greiner Woodward Clyde 
December 1999 




Name: 

General Services Administration 

Address: 

1800 F Street, NW 

Architect: 

Charles Butler 

Date of Construction: 

1917 

Campus ID: 

N/A 

Description: 

This large building occupies a full city block 
and was designed in a E-shape with interior 
parking lots. It is typical of government 
construction in its use of stone cladding over 
a steel frame. The proximity of the GSA and 
the nearby Department of the Interior to the 
Foggy Bottom serves as a reminder of the 
Federal presence throughout the District of 
Columbia. 


Historic Designation: 

National Register, 11/23/86 

References: 


Map Identifier/Reference: 

NCPC 5770, D5 
Disk 3.3, 4 



Architectural Survey of Properties in Foggy Bottom, Washington, D.C. 

Prepared by URS Greiner Woodward Clyde 
December 1999 




Name: 

Thurston Hall 

Address: 

1 900 F Street, NW 

Architect: 

Unknown 

Date of Construction: 

Unknown 

Campus ID: 

122-1 

Description: 

Thurston Hall, like many other of the 
campus dorms, was most likely built as an 
apartment building. It is eight stories tall 
with a basement. It is faced with 5-course 
American bond orange brick. There are 
some Art Deco-inspired decorations in the 
window bays with diagonally-laid bricks. 
The dorm is named for Mabel Nelson 
Thurston, the school's first female 
undergraduate student, admitted in 1888. 


Historic Designation: 

None 

References: 


Map Identifier/Reference: 

NCPC 5770. D5 
Disk 3.5 


Architectural Survey of Properties in Foggy Bottom, Washington, D.C. 

Prepared by URS Greiner Woodward Clyde 
December 1999 



Name: 

Mitchell Hall (at left in photo) 
Address: 

514 19 th Street, NW 

Architect: 

Unknown 

Date of Construction: 

Unknown 

Campus ID: 

122-2 



Description: 

This 8-story plus raised basement building, 
like its neighbors Thurston, Onassis, 
Munson, and Lafayette Halls, was most 
likely originally an apartment building. It 
is faced with Flemish bond brick on the 
main facades and 6-course American bond 
on the rear. An arcade runs along the 19 th 
Street side on the first floor entered through 
elegant sets of French doors with transoms. 
A belt course runs over the third floor. 

Both this course and the basement level are 
stone. 

Historic Designation: 

None 

References: 


Map Identifier/Reference: 

NCPC 5770. D5 
Disk 3.6 





Architectural Survey of Properties in Foggy Bottom, Washington, D.C. 

Prepared by URS Greiner Woodward Clyde 
December 1999 



Name: 

Organization of American States 

Add ress: 

1 889 F Street, NW 

Architect: 

Unknown 

Date of Construction: 

Unknown 

Campus ID: 

N/A 



Description: 

This modem office block borders the GWU 
campus and is indicative of the types of 
architecture found in the neighboring Central 
Business District. The OAS Building is 
faced with brick and has small inoperable 
windows with sloped sills 


Historic Designation: 

None 


References: 


Map Identifier/Reference: 

NCPC 5770. D5 
Disk 3.7 


Architectural Survey of Properties in Foggy Bottom, Washington, D.C. 

Prepared by URS Greiner Woodward Clyde 
December 1999 




Na me : 

The World Bank 
Address: 

1818 H Street, NW 

Architect: 

Unknown 

Date of Construction: 

1960s with 1990s addition 

Campus ID: 

N/A 

Description: 

The World Bank has built several buildings 
in the Central Business District just east of 
the GWU campus. This building was 
probably built in the 1960s and significantly 
expanded with a 1990s addition. This older 
building reflects an emphasis on verticality, 
order, and rhythm. It is constructed of 
concrete with narrow, vertically-oriented 
windows. 


Historic Designation: 

None 

References: 


Map Identifier/Reference: 

NCPC 5771, A5 
Disk 3.9 







Architectural Survey of Properties in Foggy Bottom, Washington, D.C. 

Prepared by URS Greiner Woodward Clyde 
December 1999 




Name : 

Concordia United Church of Christ 

Address: 

1920 G Street, NW 

Architect: 

Schulze and Goenner 

Date of Construction: 

1885-91 

Campus ID: 

N/A 

Description: 

This brick church was built by a German 
Lutheran congregation, who gave it its 
original name. Die Vereinigte Kirche. when 
it opened in 1981 . Located just off campus, 
it reflects the strong influence of German 
immigrants in the Foggy Bottom area. The 
step gable roof and massive bell tower are 
reminiscent of European antecedents. 


Historic Designation: 

DC Landmark, 8/11/77 
National Register, 12/14/78 

References: 


Map Identifier/Reference: 

NCPC 5770. D5 
Disk 3.10. 13, 14 



Architectural Survey of Properties in Foggy Bottom, Washington, D.C. 

Prepared by URS Greiner Woodward Clyde 
December 1999 



Name : 

Law Building/Career Development 
0ffice(2000-02), Sigma Chi house (2004) 

Address: 

2000-2004 G Street, NW 

A rchitect : 

Unknow'n 

Date of Construction: 

c. 1890-1900 

Campus ID: 

103-6, 103-7 



Description: 

These adjoining tow'nhouses are reminiscent 
of the residential tow'nhouses found in the 
Foggy Bottom area. They are representative 
of the university’s reuse of residential 
buildings for offices and classrooms. They 
are brick w'ith mansard roofs. The building 
at 2004 G is the Sigma Chi Fraternity house 
and has a 3-sided bay. 


Historic Designation: 

None 


References: 


Map Identifier/Reference: 

NCPC 5770, D5 
Disk 3.12 




Architectural Survey of Properties in Foggy Bottom, Washington, D.C. 

Prepared by URS Greiner Woodward Clyde 
December 1999 




Name: 

Thomas Edison Building 
Address: 

1 900 Pennsylvania Avenue, NW 

Architect: 

Unknown 

Date of Construction: 

Unknown 

Campus ID: 

N/A 

Description: 

This building is the PEPCO headquarters and 
is typical of the 1970s office block found in 
Washington. It is constructed of concrete 
and is modular in form and appearance. The 
square windows are deeply recessed. 


Historic Designation: 

None 


References: 


Map Identifier/Reference: 

NCPC 5771. A5 
Disk 3.16 



Architectural Survey of Properties in Fogg}' Bottom, Washington, D.C. 

Prepared by URS Greiner Woodward Clyde 
December 1999 




Name : 

Lemer Hall/Washington Law Center 
Address: 

2000 H Street, NW, 

Architect: 

Keyes Condon Florance 

Date of Construction: 

1984 

Campus ID: 

102-14 

Description: 

The modem Lemer Hall was added to 
Stockton Hall and with the Jacob Bums Law 
Library, joined to the other side of Stockton, 
creates the National Law Center. This 
building is constructed with a brick veneer to 
match Stockton and relates to the 
predominant historic building material of the 
Foggy Bottom area. 


Historic Designation: 

None 


References: 

AIA Guide, p. 157 


Map Identifier/Reference: 

NCPC 5771. A5 
Disk 3. 17 



Architectural Survey of Properties in Foggy Bottom, Washington, D.C. 

Prepared by URS Greiner Woodward Clyde 
December 1999 



Name: 

St. James Suites (950 24th) and Circle Arms 
Apartments (24 1 6 K) 

Address: 

950 24 th Street, NW and 2416 K Street, NW 

Architect: 

Unknown 

Date of Construction: 

Unknown 

Campus ID: 

N/A 



Description: 

These two apartment buildings are 
representative of a building type and use 
found throughout the Foggy Bottom and 
GWU areas. They are each eight stories tall. 
The Circle Arms, however, is an older 
buildings, while the St. James Suites is a 
modem building made to reflect its 
surroundings. The Circle Arms is faced with 
light tan brick and has two square bays and 
windows flush with the exterior wall surface. 
The St. James Suites is faced with brick and 
has projecting 3-sided bays. 

Historic Designation: 

None 

References: 


Map Identifier/Reference: 

NCPC 5771, B3 
Disk 5.1 




Architectural Survey of Properties in Foggy Bottom, Washington, D.C. 

Prepared by URS Greiner Woodward Clyde 
December 1999 



Name: 

The Bader (2515) and 2501 K Street 

Address: 

2501 and 25 15 K Street, NW 

Architect: 

Unknown 

Date of Construction: 

Unknown 

Campus ID: 

N/A 



Description: 

These two apartment/condominium 
buildings create an interesting juxtaposition 
in style. The Bader, on the left, is Art Deco- 
inspired with 2 shallow curved bays and 
projecting brick bands. The building at 2501 
K is more modem with its steel structure 
exposed. It uses several colors of brick to 
add to its interesting architecture. 


Historic Designation: 


References: 


M ap Identifier/Re fere nce: 

NCPC 5771, B2 
Disk 5.3 





Architectural Survey of Properties in Foggy Bottom, Washington, D.C. 

Prepared by URS Greiner Woodward Clyde 
December 1999 



Name: 

Row Houses 

Address: 

955-963 25 th Street, NW 

Architect: 

Unknown 

Date of Construction: 

c. 1905 

Campus ID: 

N/A 

Description: 

These modest row houses are indicative of 
the former working class residents of Foggy 
Bottom. Typical of this urban vernacular 
type, they are simple and symmetric brick 
dwellings with little ornamentation. Their 
one decoration is a shared cornice of 
corbelled brick. 


Historic Designation: 

Foggy Bottom Historic District 
DC Landmark 10/15/86 
National Register 10/14/87 

References: 


Map Identifier/Reference: 

NCPC 5771, B2 
Disk 5.4 






Architectural Survey of Properties in Foggy Bottom, Washington, D.C. 

Prepared by URS Greiner Woodward Clyde 
December 1999 








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Name: 

Row' Houses 

Address: 

93 1-937 25 th Street, NW 

Architect: 

Unknown 

Date of Construction: 

Unknown 

Campus ID: 

N/A 

Description: 

Although well disguised, these row houses 
are later infill in the Foggy Bottom Historic 
District. They contribute to its overall 
appearance with their row house form, flat 
facades, and use of brick. They are a 
wonderful example of how a sensitive design 
can combine compatibility with the 
surrounding area with modem amenities for 
residents. 


Historic Designation: 

Foggy Bottom Historic District 
DC Landmark 10/15/86 
National Register 10/14/87 

References: 


Map Identifier/Reference: 

NCPC 5771, B2 
Disk 5.6 




Architectural Surv ey of Properties in Foggy Bottom, Washington, D.C. 

Prepared by URS Greiner Woodward Clyde 
December 1 999 



Name: 

Row Houses 

Address: 

939-945 25 th Street, NW 

Architect: 

Unknown 

Date of Construction: 

Unknown 

Campus ID: 

N/A 



Description: 

This unusual fagade, although of newer 
construction, contributes to the overall 
appearance of the Foggy Bottom 
neighborhood. Its scale and materials are 
compatible with older architecture in the 
area, but its unique design makes it distinct 
from other row houses. The fagade is 
broken by double octagonal bays, between 
which are two doors. The building stands 
at only one story plus a basement and has 
modest brick adornment. 

Historic Designation: 

Foggy Bottom Historic District 
DC Landmark 10/15/86 
National Register 10/14/87 

References: 


Man Identifier/Reference: 

NCPC 5771, B2 
Disk 5.5 





Architectural Survey of Properties in Foggy Bottom, Washington, D.C. 

Prepared by URS Greiner Woodward Clyde 
December 1999 



Name: 

Row Houses 

Address: 

918-922 25 th Street, NW 

Architect: 

Unknown 

Date of Construction: 

c. 1905 

Campus ID: 

N/A 



Description: 

These row houses are typical of those found 
throughout the western end of Foggy Bottom 
in the Historic District. They are modest in 
size, with little detailing. They represent the 
type of housing most commonly used by the 
area’s working class and immigrant 
inhabitants. More elaborate than some local 
row houses, these have segmentally arched 
windows and corbelled brick cornices. 


Historic Designation: 

Foggy Bottom Historic District 
DC Landmark 10/15/86 
National Register 10/14/87 

References: 


Map Identifier/Reference: 

NCPC 5771, A2 
Disk 5.7 




Architectural Surv ey of Properties in Foggy Bottom, Washington, D.C. 

Prepared by URS Greiner Woodward Clyde 
December 1999 



Name: 

Duplex 

Address: 

2529-253 1 Eye Street, NW 

Architect: 

Unknown 

Date of Construction: 

Unknown 

Campus ID: 

N/A 



Description: 

This duplex is an anomaly in the Foggy 
Bottom neighborhood. Built between two 
older row houses, it is a modem block 
containing two units, each with its own 
garage fronting on Eye Street. A Bauhaus 
influence can be seen in the bands of 
w indows. They are constructed of concrete 
with brick veneer. 


Historic Designation: 

Foggy Bottom Historic District 
DC Landmark 10/15/86 
National Register 10/14/87 

References: 


Map Identifier/Reference: 

NCPC 5771, A2 
Disk 5.10 









Architectural Survey of Properties in Foggy Bottom, Washington, D.C. 

Prepared by URS Greiner Woodward Clyde 
December 1999 



Name: 

Row Houses 

Address: 

2512-2524 Eye Street, NW 

Architect: 

Unknown 

Date of Construction: 

Late lO^-early 20 th century 

Campus ID: 

N/A 



Description: 

These intact row houses face south on Eye 
Street just off the GW campus. Like so 
many of the row houses in Foggy Bottom, 
they are small and boxy. They are more 
distinguished, however, by their location on 
a slight rise. They are accessible by a flight 
of steps ascending above the street. They 
also have more decoration, and more variety 
of decoration than many of the working class 
row houses in the area. 

Historic Designation: 

Foggy Bottom Historic District 
DC Landmark 10/15/86 
National Register 10/14/87 

References: 


Map Identifier/Reference: 

NCPC5771, A2 
Disk 5.1 1 



Architectural Survey of Properties in Foggy Bottom, Washington, D.C. 

Prepared by URS Greiner Woodward Clyde 
December 1999 



Name: 

Streetscape 

Address: 

2400 block of Eye Street, NW 

Architect: 

Unknown 

Date of Construction: 

Late 19 th -early 20 th century 

Campus ID: 

N/A 



Description: 

These low-profile row houses, with a 
modern apartment behind, are representative 
of the Foggy Bottom neighborhood. Row- 
houses from the late 1 9 th and early 20 th 
centuries house local residents, as do newer 
high-rise apartments and condominiums. 
These row houses, like others in Foggy 
Bottom, are constructed of brick and have a 
simple, straightforward, and boxy style and 
little ornamentation. 


Historic Designation: 

Foggy Bottom Historic District 
DC Landmark 10/15/86 
National Register 10/14/87 

References: 


Map Identifier/Reference: 

NCPC 5771, A2 
Disk 5.12 







Architectural Survey of Properties in Foggy Bottom, Washington, D.C. 

Prepared by URS Greiner Woodward Clyde 
December 1999 



Name: 

Row Houses/Commercial Buildings 
Address: 

2307-233 1 Virginia Avenue, NW 

Architect: 

Unknown 

Date of Construction: 

Late 1 9 th century 

Campus ID: 

N/A 

Description: 

This row of commercial and residential 
buildings is reflective of various periods and 
styles of architecture. The buildings are of 
varying heights, some three stories tall, some 
four. The Community Policing Center is 
located at the end of the row at 233 1 . The 
others appear to be rental housing. 


Historic Designation: 

None 


References: 


Map Identifier/Reference: 

NCPC, 5770, D3 
Disk 1.18 





Architectural Surv ey of Properties in Foggy Bottom, Washington, D.C. 

Prepared by URS Greiner Woodward Clyde 
December 1999 



Name: 

The Allen Lee 
Address: 

2224 F Street, NW 

Architect: 

Unknown 

Date of Construction: 

c. 1910 

Campus ID: 

N/A 



Description: 

Strikingly situated at the comer of F and 23 rd 
Streets, this white brick building with blue 
trim rises higher than any of its historic 
neighbors. It was likely built as an 
apartment building in the early part of this 
century. As such, it would have been a very 
early representative of its type. Its 
articulated facade, decorative brickwork and 
octagonal comer turret give it an opulence 
not seen in many of Foggy Bottom’s early 
buildings. 

Historic Designation: 

None 

References: 


Map Identifier/Reference: 

NCPC, 5770, D3 
Disk 1.19,20 




Architectural Survey of Properties in Foggy Bottom, Washington, D.C. 

Prepared by URS Greiner Woodward Clyde 
December 1999 



Name: 

Fraternities and the Newman Catholic 
Student Center 

Address: 

2206-2212 F Street, NW 

Architect: 

Unknown 

Date of Construction: 

Late 19 th century 


Campus ID: 



Description: 

This row of former residences typifies the 
type of architecture found around the GW 
campus. The University is currently using 
the buildings to house several fraternities 
and sororities as well as the Catholic Student 
Center. 


Historic Designation: 

None 

References: 


Map Identifier/Reference: 

NCPC, 5770, D3 
Disk 2.2 



Architectural Survey of Properties in Foggy Bottom, Washington, D.C. 

Prepared by URS Greiner Woodward Clyde 
December 1999 



Name: 

Apartments 

Address: 

515 22 nd Street, NW 

Architect: 

Unknown 

Date of Construction: 

Unknown 

Campus ID: 

N/A 



Description: 

This type of large apartment building is a 
common occurrence in the Foggy Bottom 
neighborhood. This building has a white 
ashlar base and rises to eight stories in 
height. The decoration and style exhibit an 
Art Deco influence. 


Historic Designation: 

None 


References: 


Map Identifier/Reference: 

NCPC, 5770, D4 
Disk 2.3 





Architectural Survey of Properties in Foggy Bottom, W ashington, D.C. 

Prepared by URS Greiner Woodward Clyde 
December 1999 



Name: 

Row Houses 

Address: 

2140-2156 F Street, NW 

Architect: 

Unknown 

Date of Construction: 

Late 19 th century 

Campus ID: 


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Description: 

Typical of the area surrounding the GW 
campus are row houses such as these. Less 
modest than some of Foggy Bottom’s more 
working class housing, these residences have 
3-sided bays with tent roofs, while the comer 
building has a round bay and turret roof. 

They are constructed of brick with stone 
details. 


Historic Designation: 

None 


References: 


Map Identifier/Reference: 

NCPC, 5770, D4 
Disk 2.4 



Architectural Surv ey of Properties in Foggy Bottom, Washington, D.C. 

Prepared by URS Greiner Woodward Clyde 
December 1999 



Name: 

The Dakota 

Metropolitan Medical Center 
Address: 

2100 and 21 12 F Street, NW 

Architect: 

Unknown 

Date of Construction: 

Unknown 

Campus ID: 

Unknown 



Description: 

The 8-story Dakota residence hall reflects 
many of the apartment buildings in the GW 
campus area. Its gabled bays look like 
dormers and its concrete base and details are 
meant to resemble stone. At 2 1 1 2 F Street is 
the modem brick and glass Metropolitan 
Medical Center, which contains doctors’ 
offices. 


Historic Designation: 

None 


References: 


Map Identifier/Reference: 

NCPC, 5770, D4 
Disk 2.6 



Architectural Surv ey of Properties in Foggy Bottom, Washington, D.C. 

Prepared by URS Greiner Woodward Clyde 
December 1999 



Name: 

Monroe House 

Address: 

522 21 st Street, NW 

Architect: 

Unknown 

Date of Construction: 

Unknown 

Campus ID: 

N/A 



Description: 

The Monroe House building is nine stories 
tall with a penthouse. It is tan brick with 
whitish grey stone panels below the 
windows. Its articulated facade is made 
more complex by the varied panel placement 
and fenestration design. 


Historic Designation: 

None 


References: 


Map Identifier/Reference: 

NCPC, 5770, D4 
Disk 2.7 




Architectural Survey of Properties in Foggy Bottom, Washington, D.C. 

Prepared by URS Greiner Woodward Clyde 
December 1999 



Name: 

Potomac Park Apartments 

Address: 

510 21 51 Street, NW 

Architect: 

Unknown 

Date of Construction: 

Unknown 

Campus ID: 

N/A 



Description: 

Very typical of apartments built in the 1950s 
and 1960s, the Potomac Park Apartments is 
faced with cream colored brick. The 8-story 
tall building has two bays and casement 
windows that are flush with the exterior 
wall. It is a common style and type of 
building found throughout the Foggy Bottom 
neighborhood. 


Historic Designation: 

None 


References: 


Map Identifier/Reference: 

NCPC, 5770, D4 
Disk 2.8 



Architectural Surv ey of Properties in Foggy Bottom, Washington, D.C. 

Prepared by URS Greiner Woodward Clyde 
December 1999 



Name: 

American Foreign Service Association 
Embassy of Bosnia-Herzogovina 
Address: 

2101 E. Street, NW 
21 09 E Street, NW 

Architect: 

Unknown 

Date of Construction: 

c. 1935-40 


Campus ID: 

N/A 



Description: 

Surrounding the GWU campus are several 
embassies and notable institutions. Located 
in the same block are the Embassy of 
Bosnia-Herzogovina at 2109 E Street and the 
American Foreign Service Association at 
2101. Both are built in the restrained 
modem style of the 1930s and 1940s and are 
concrete. The Embassy rises to five stories, 
while the Association is only three. 


Historic Designation: 

None 


References: 


Map Identifier/Reference: 

NCPC, 5770, D4 
Disk 2.9 




Architectural Survey of Properties in Foggy Bottom, W ashington, D.C. 

Prepared by URS Greiner Woodward Clyde 
December 1999 



Name: 

Pan American Health Organization/World 
Health Organization - Offices 

Address: 

525 E Street, NW 

Architect: 

Roman Fresnedo-Siri, Justement, Elam, 
Callner & Kidd 

Date of Construction: 

1964 


Campu s ID: 

KVA 



Description: 

With its contemporary curved tower and 
circular conference center, this building 
group suggests a notable, if unorthodox, 
solution to Washington's many narrow 
triangular sites. It is a fine expression of the 
modern architecture of its era. 


Historic Designation: 

None 


References: 

AIA Guide, p. 155 


Map Identifier/Reference: 

NCPC, 5770, D3 
Disk 2. 10 




Architectural Survey of Properties in Foggy Bottom, Washington, D.C. 

Prepared by URS Greiner Woodward Clyde 
December 1999 



Name: 

CVS and liquor store 
Address: 

2123 and 2125 E Street, NW 

Architect: 

Unknown 

Date of Construction: 

c. 1930 

Campus ID: 

N/A 



Description: 

This charming historic store was probably 
built in the 1930s or 1940s and exhibits the 
influence of the Art Deco and Modeme 
styles. It is a small 1 -story concrete-faced 
brick building that currently houses a CVS 
Pharmacy and a liquor store, which are 
probably similar to the types of businesses it 
originally housed. The facade is decorated 
with three large medallions and two smaller 
ones at its top corners. 

Historic Designation: 

None 


References: 


Map Identifier/Reference: 

NCPC, 5770, D4 
Disk 2.11 



Architectural Survey of Properties in Foggy Bottom, Washington, D.C. 

Prepared by URS Greiner Woodward Clyde 
December 1999 



Name: 

Office Building 

Address: 

2121 Virginia Avenue, NW 

Architect: 

Unknown 

Date of Construction: 

1980s 

Campus ID: 

N/A 



Description: 

This building is an 8-story modem office 
building. It contains a central block with 
two flanking wings. The building is 
constructed of concrete with bands of tinted 
glass fenestration. It relates little to its 
surrounding environment. 


Historic Designation: 

None 


References: 


Map Identifier/Reference: 

NCPC, 5770, D4 
Disk 2.12 



Architectural Surv ey of Properties in Foggy Bottom, Washington, D.C. 

Prepared by URS Greiner Woodward Clyde 
December 1999 



Name: 

Pan-American Health Organization/World 
Health Organization - Conference Center 

Address: 

525 E Street, NW 

Architect: 

Roman Fresnedo-Siri, Justement, Elam, 
Callner & Kidd 

Date of Construction: 

1964 


Campus ID: 

N/A 



Description: 

With its contemporary curved tower and 
circular conference center, this building 
group suggests a notable, if unorthodox, 
solution to Washington’s many narrow 
triangular sites. It is a fine expression of the 
modem architecture of its era. Pictured here 
is the Conference Center, a round structure 
sheathed in metal. 


Historic Designation: 

None 


References: 
AIA, p. 155 


Map Identifier/Refere nce : 

NCPC, 5770, D3 
Disk 2.13 




Architectural Surv ey of Properties in Fogg) Bottom, Washington, D.C. 

Prepared by URS Greiner Woodward Clyde 
December 1999 



Name: 

Associated General Contractors of America 

Address: 

1 957 E Street, NW 

Architect: 

Unknown 

Date of Construction: 

1950s 

Campus ID: 

N/A 


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Description: 

Surrounding the GW campus is a variety of 
building types and uses. This former home 
of the Associated Contractors of America is 
an example of a smaller institution located 
near the campus. The steel frame building is 
largely faced with green-tinted glass. It rises 
to four stories in height with concrete at each 
comer. 


Historic Designation: 

None 


References: 


Map Identifier/Reference: 

NCPC, 5770, D5 
Disk 2.14 


Architectural Surv ey of Properties in Foggy Bottom, Washington, D.C. 

Prepared by URS Greiner Woodward Clyde 
December 1999 



Name: 

The York 

Address: 

532 20 lh Street, NW 

Architect: 

Unknown 

Date of Construction: 

Unknown 

Campus ID: 

N/A 



Description: 

Like so many other apartment buildings in 
the campus and Foggy Bottom areas, the 
York exhibits a subdued Art Deco style. It 
faced with tan brick and has a glass block 
entry way. The comers are fenestrated on 
both sides. 


Historic Designation: 

None 


References: 


Map Identifier/Reference: 

NCPC, 5770, D5 
Disk 2.15 



Architectural Surv ey of Properties in Foggy Bottom, Washington, D.C. 

Prepared by URS Greiner Woodward Clyde 
December 1999 



Name: 

Empire Apartments 

Address: 

2000 F Street, NW 

Architect: 

Unknown 

Date of Construction: 

Unknown 

Campus fP: 

N/A 


Description: 

This 8-story tall apartment building is faced 
with brick with two subtly articulated bays. 
It is similar in scale style to many of the 
area's apartment buildings. 


Historic Designation: 

None 


References: 



Map Identifier/Reference: 

NCPC, 5770, D5 
Disk 2. 16 




Architectural Survey of Properties in Foggy Bottom, Washington, D.C. 

Prepared by URS Greiner Woodward Clyde 
December 1999 



Name: 

The Statesman 
Address: 

2020 F Street, NW 

Architect: 

Unknown 

Date of Construction: 

Unknown 

Campus ID: 

N/A 



Description: 

Another prime example of apartment 
buildings in the GWU campus and Foggy 
Bottom areas is The Statesman. This 8-story 
tall building is faced with white brick and 
has awning windows. The central square 
bay has banks of windows, creating 
continuous bands of fenestration on each 
floor. 


Historic Designation: 


References: 


Map Identifier/Reference: 

NCPC, 5770, D4 
Disk 2.17 



Architectural Surv ey of Properties in Foggy Bottom, W ashington, D.C. 

Prepared by URS Greiner Woodward Clyde 
December 1999 



Name: 

The Letterman 
Address: 

2030 F Street, NW 

Architect: 

Unknown 

Date of Construction: 

Unknown 

Campus ID: 

N/A 



Description: 

The 10-story tall Letterman is another of this 
area’s apartment buildings. It is faced with 
tan brick with a white entryway. It has three 
projecting square bays and windows flush 
with the facade. 


Historic Designation: 

None 


References: 


Map Identifier/Reference: 

NCPC, 5770, D4 
Disk 2.18 









Architectural Survey of Properties in Foggy Bottom, Washington, D.C. 

Prepared by URS Greiner Woodward Clyde 
December 1999 



Name: 

Watergate Complex 

Address: 

2500-2700 Virginia Avenue, NW; 600-700 
New Hampshire Avenue, NW 

Architect: 

Luigi Moretti and Mario di Valmarana 

Date of Construction: 

1964-72 

Campus ID: 

N/A 



Map Identifier/Reference: 

NCPC 5770, D2; 5771, A1 and A2 
Disk 1 .7 


Description: 

The Watergate apartment and retail complex 
contains four buildings, all constructed of 
reinforced concrete. Identifying 
characteristics include the overall curvilinear 
shape, horizontal ribbon windows, and 
balconies with '‘toothpick” balusters. The 
complex replaced a gasworks site that was in 
keeping with the formerly industrial 
character of the area. 

Historic Designation: 

None 

References: 

AIA Guide, p. 156 

Best Addresses, p.432-441 

Buildings of DC, p.213-214 



Architectural Survey of Properties in Foggy Bottom, Washington, D.C. 

Prepared by URS Greiner Woodward Clyde 
December 1999 



Name: 

Columbia Plaza 

Address: 

2400 Virginia Avenue. NW 

Architect: 

Keyes, Lethbridge, and Condon 

Date of Construction: 

1963 

Campus ID: 

N/A 



Description: 

The modem Columbia Plaza is an upscale 
residential complex built during a period of 
Urban Renewal in the Foggy Bottom area. 
The existing buildings are only part of a 
planned all-inclusive, high-rise development. 


Historic Designation: 

None 


References: 

A1A Guide, p. 1 56 
Best Addresses, p. 476 
Buildings of DC, p. 212-213 


Map Identifier/Reference: 

NCPC 5770, D3 
Disk 1.13 





Architectural Survey of Properties in Foggy Bottom, Washington, D.C. 

Prepared by URS Greiner Woodward Clyde 
December 1999 



Name: 

The Plaza 

Address: 

800 25 th Street, NW 

Architect: 

Edmund Dreyfuss and Associates 

Date of Construction: 

1973 

Campus ID: 

N/A 



Description: 

This 8-story condominium building stands 
on concrete piers, creating a recessed entry 
and covered walkway around the building. 
The geometric mass of the building is 
mirrored in the regular placement of 
windows and the balconies sided with square 
metal panels. 


Historic Designation: 

None 


References: 

Best Addresses, p.477 


Map Identifier/Reference: 

NCPC, 5771, A3 
Disk 1.6 



Architectural Survey of Properties in Foggy Bottom, W ashington, D.C. 

Prepared by URS Greiner Woodward Clyde 
December 1999 



Name: 

Potomac Plaza Terraces 

Address: 

730 24 th Street, NW 

Architect: 

Unknown 

Date of Construction: 

1950s- 1960s 

Campus ID: 

N/A 



Description: 

This building is a 9-story tall white brick 
garden apartment. It is located immediately 
adjacent to the GWU campus and reflects 
the boom of apartment building in this area 
in the 1950s through the 1970s. The 
building, whose horizontality is emphasized 
by broad bands of balconies that run the 
length of the facade on every floor, is also 
embellished with aluminum trim. 


Historic Designation: 

None 


References: 


Man Identifier/Reference: 

NCPC, 5771, A3 
Disk 1.1 






Architectural Survey of Properties in Foggy Bottom, Washington, D.C. 

Prepared by URS Greiner Woodward Clyde 
December 1999 



Name: 

Bon Wit Plaza 
Address: 

2401 H Street, NW 

Architect: 

Unknown 

Date of Construction: 

Unknown 

Campus ID: 

N/A 



Description: 

This 8-story tall brick structure is highly 
representative of the apartment buildings 
located throughout Foggy Bottom and the 
GW campus. It is faced with cream colored 
brick and has a horizontal banded stone 
foundation. 


Historic Designation: 

None 


References: 


Map Identifier/Reference: 

NCPC.5771, A3 
Disk 1.2 


Architectural Survey of Properties in Foggy Bottom, Washington, D.C. 

Prepared by URS Greiner Woodward Clyde 
December 1999 



Name : 

Potomac Plaza 

Address: 

2475 New Hampshire Avenue, NW 

Architect: 

Dixon and Weppner 

Date of Construction: 

1954-56 

Campus ID: 

N/A 



Description: 

The L-shaped Potomac Plaza is eight stories 
tall with a basement. The base is exposed 
and has vertical black columns. A covered 
porte cochere leads to the front entrance. 
The simple style with windows flush to the 
exterior walls is common in apartment 
buildings in the area. 


Historic Designation: 

None 


References: 

Best Addresses, p.413-417 


Map IdentifierTReference: 

NCPC, 5771, A2 
Disk 1.3 






Architectural Surv ey of Properties in Foggy Bottom, Washington, D.C. 

Prepared by URS Greiner Woodward Clyde 
December 1 999 



Name: 

Double Tree Guest Suites 
The Elise 

Address: 

801 24 th Street. NW 
825 24 th Street, NW 

Architect: 

Unknown 

Date of Construction: 

Unknown 

Campus ID: 

N/A 



Description: 

The 10-story Doubletree Guest Suites is a 
brown brick building with bays articulating 
its otherwise flat facade. It is located 
immediately adjacent to the 8-story Elise 
Apartments, constructed of tan brick with 
similar square bays. Both buildings have 
windows flush with the exterior wall. 


Historic Designation: 

None 


References: 


Map Identifier/Reference: 

NCPC, 5771, A3 
Disk 1.4 




Architectural Survey of Properties in Foggy Bottom, W ashington, D.C. 

Prepared by URS Greiner Woodward Clyde 
December 1999 



Name: 

Row Mouses 

Address: 

800-818 New Hampshire Avenue, NW 

Architect: 

Unknown 

Date of Construction: 

1880s- 1900 

Campus ID: 

N/A 



Description: 

This row of late 19 th and early 20 th century 
row houses represents a fanciful approach to 
row house design. Because many of Foggy 
Bottom’s early inhabitants were of the 
working class, such highly decorated facades 
were less common. These row houses, 
however, have a European styling. They are 
two stories tall and are joined in the back 
with a similar row on 25 th Street. 


Historic Designation: 

Foggy Bottom Historic District 
DC Landmark 10/15/86 
National Register 10/14/87 

References: 


Map Identifier/Reference: 

NCPC, 5771, A2 
Disk 1 .5 



Architectural Survey of Properties in Foggy Bottom, Washington, D.C. 

Prepared by URS Greiner Woodward Clyde 
December 1999 



Name: 

Row Houses 

Address: 

800-821 25 th Street, NW 

Architect: 

Unknown 

Date of Construction: 

Late 1 9 th century 

Campus ID: 

N/A 



Description: 

This row of late 1 9 th century row houses 
represents a fanciful approach to row house 
design. Because many of Foggy Bottom’s 
early inhabitants were of the working class, 
such highly decorated facades were less 
common. These row houses, however, have 
a European styling. They are two stories tall. 
The comer building, more representative of 
contemporary architecture, is three stories 
tall with a mansard roof and comer turret. 

Historic Designation: 

Foggy Bottom Historic District 
DC Landmark 10/15/86 
National Register 10/14/87 

References: 


Map Identifier/Reference: 

NCPC, 5771, A2 
Disk 1.8 



Architectural Surv ey of Properties in Foggy Bottom, Washington, D.C. 

Prepared by URS Greiner Woodward Clyde 
December 1999 



Name: 

Hall on Virginia Avenue 
Address: 

2601 Virginia Avenue, NW 

Architect: 

Unknown 

Date of Construction: 

Unknown 

Campus ID: 

Unknown 



Description: 

Removed from the rest of campus, this tall 
building rises above a landscape dotted with 
late 1 9" century row houses and dissected by 
several major arterial roads. 

This building serves as hotel for the GW 
campus. 


Historic Designation: 

None 


References: 


Map Identifier/Reference: 

NCPC, 5771, A2 
Disk 1.9 







Architectural Survey of Properties in Foggy Bottom, Washington, D.C. 

Prepared by URS Greiner Woodward Clyde 
December 1 999 



Name: 

Exxon Gas Station 

Address: 

On Virginia Avenue, at the northwest corner 
of the Watergate 

Architect: 

Unknown 

Date of Construction: 

1930s 

Campus ID: 

N/A 



Description: 

This small stone gas building is a reminder 
of service stations of the past. It has two 
front gables with steeply pitched roofs and is 
located just off several major roads just 
outside of Rock Creek Park 


Historic Designation: 

None 


References: 


Map Identifier/Reference: 

NCPC, 5771, A1 
Disk 1.10 


Architectural Survey of Properties in Foggy Bottom, Washington, D.C. 

Prepared by URS Greiner Woodward Clyde 
December 1999 



Name: 

Watergate Apartment Leasing Buildings 

Address: 

2639-2635 Eye Street, NW 

Architect: 

Unknown 

Date of Construction: 

Late 1 9 th century 

Campus ID: 

N/A 



Description: 

The modest scale and straightforward 
massing of these three row houses was 
typical of row houses in Foggy Bottom. 

Built between 1870 and 1910, row houses in 
this area tend to be small brick dwellings 
usually with cornices as their only 
decoration. These buildings, at three bays 
wide, were probably slightly larger than 
many of the other working class dwellings 
found in the Foggy Bottom area. 

Historic Designation: 

Foggy Bottom Historic District 
DC Landmark 10/15/86 
National Register 10/14/87 

References: 


Map Identifier/Reference: 

NCPC, 5771, A2 
Disk 1.11 



Architectural Survey of Properties in Foggy Bottom, Washington, D.C. 

Prepared by URS Greiner Woodward Clyde 
December 1999 


Name: 

Saudi Arabian Embassy 



Address: 

601 New Hampshire Avenue, NW 

Architect: 

Unknown 

Date of Construction: 

Unknown 

Campus ID: 

N/A 



Description: 

The geometric massing of the Embassy of 
Saudi Arabia reflects Washington's federal 
architecture style. It is an imposing 
structure, despite its medium size. 


Historic Designation: 


References: 


Map Identifier/Reference: 

NCPC, 5770, D2 
Disk 1.14 






Architectural Survey of Properties in Foggy Bottom, Washington, D.C. 

Prepared by URS Greiner Woodward Clyde 
December 1999 



Name: 

The Remington 

Address: 

601 24 th Street, NW 

Architect: 

Unknown 

Date of Construction: 

Unknown 

Campus ID: 

N/A 



Description: 

This 1970s apartment building is a 
9-story brown brick building with a green 
awning. It is fairly typical of architecture of 
the 1970s in its style and materials. 


Historic Designation: 

None 

References: 


Map Identifier/Reference: 

NCPC, 5770, D3 
Disk 1.16 





Architectural Survey of Properties in Foggy Bottom, W ashington, D.C. 

Prepared by URS Greiner Woodward Clyde 
December 1999 



Nam e: 

Snow’s Court 

Address: 

1-7 Snows Court, NW 

Architect: 


Date of Const ruction: 

c. 1885 

Campus ID: 

N/A 



Description: 

The seven houses on Snows Court are a rare 
reminder of alley dwellings that were once 
found throughout Washington, D.C. These 
modest 2-story row houses are located 
between 24 Ih , 25 th , I, and K Streets. Housing 
within alleys was constructed primarily by 
speculative developers after the Civil War to 
accommodate the influx of new residents to 
DC. Alley housing was later determined 
unfit for inhabitation and much of it was 
demolished. 

Historic Designation: 

Foggy Bottom Historic District 
DC Landmark 10/15/86 
National Register 10/14/87 

References: 


Map Identifier/Reference: 

NCPC 5771, B2 
Disk A.l 




Architectural Survey of Properties in Foggy Bottom, W ashington. D.C. 

Prepared by URS Greiner Woodward Clyde 
December 1999 




Name: 

Alley Row Houses 

Add ress: 

2521-2535 Queen Anne’s Lane, NW 

Architect: 

Unknown 

Date of C onstruction: 

Unknown 

Campus ID: 

N/A 

Description: 

These row houses are located in an alley 
between 25 lh , 26'\ I, and K Streets. They are 
late 20 th century homes meant to imitate the 
alley dwellings of the 19 lh century. Each has 
a garage on the first level and historically 
inspired decorative motifs around the doors 
and windows 


Historic Designation: 

Foggy Bottom Historic District 
DC Landmark 10/15/86 
National Register 10/14/87 

References: 


Map Identifier/Reference: 

NCPC 5771, A2 
Disk A. 2 






Architectural Survey of Properties in Foggy Bottom, W ashington, D.C. 

Prepared by URS Greiner Woodward Clyde 
December 1999 



Name: 

Alley Row Houses 

Address; 

91 1-921 Hughes Mews 

A r efuted: 

Unknown 

Date of Construction: 

c. 1885 

Campus ID: 

N/A 



Desc ri ption: 

These six row houses are only accessible 
through a system of alleys. Like Snow’s 
Court, they are a rare example of alley 
dwellings. Located between 25 U| , 26 th , I, and 
K Streets, they were probably built by 
speculative developers. These brick houses 
have corbelled cornices and are two stories 
tall. 

Historic Des i gnati on: 

Foggy Bottom Historic District 
DC Landmark 10/15/86 
National Register 10/14/87 

References: 


Map Identifier/Reference: 

NCPC 5771, A2 
Disk A. 3 



Architectural Surv ey of Properties in Foggy Bottom, Washington, D.C. 

Prepared by URS Greiner Woodward Clyde 
December 1999 



Name: 

Row Houses 

Address: 

842 New Hampshire Avenue, NW 
2400-2402 Eye Street, NW 

Architect: 

James H. Grant 

Date of Co nstru ct ion: 

1886 

Campus ID: 

N/A 



Description: 

These houses, which make up part of a row 
along Eye Street, are representative of 
housing in the Foggy Bottom neighborhood. 
They were designed and built by James H. 
Grant for speculator Samuel Norments. 

They are brick with a corbelled comice, 
decorative beaded moldings in the arches 
over doors and windows, and a transom over 
each door. The building at 842 New 
Hampshire was designed as a store and 
residence. 

Histo ric Desi gnation: 

Foggy Bottom Historic District 
DC Landmark 10/15/86 
National Register 10/14/87 

References: 


Map Identifier/Reference: 

NCPC 5771, A3 
Disk A. 4 





Architectural Survey of Properties in Foggy Bottom. W ashington, D.C. 

Prepared by URS Greiner Woodward Clyde 
December 1999 



Name: 

Row Houses 

Address: 

2407-241 1 Eye Street, NW 

Architect: 

A.H. Beers 

Simon Oppenheimer, Builder 

Date of Construction: 

1909 


Campus ID: 

N/A 



Description: 

These three row houses are constructed of 
brick with rough-faced stone lintels and 
finished stone sills. They are two stories tall 
and abut the 9-story apartment/office 
building to the east. The cornice contains a 
small frieze and an exaggerated dentil 
course. 


Historic Designation: 

Foggy Bottom Historic District 
DC Landmark 10/15/86 
National Register 10/14/87 

References: 


Map I dent ifier/R eference: 

NCPC 5771, A3 
Disk A. 5 



Architectural Survey of Properties in Foggy Bottom, Washington, D.C. 

Prepared by URS Greiner Woodward Clyde 
December 1999 



Name: 

Walter G. Ross Hall and Himmelfarb Library 

Address: 

2300 Eye Street, NW 

Architect: 

Mills, Petticord, and Mills 

Date of Construction: 

1970 

Campus ID: 

41-1 



Description: 

This 7-story reinforced concrete building 
occupies nearly three-quarters of the block 
between H, 1, 23 rd and 24 lh Streets. It 
contains the 3-story Himmelfarb Medical 
Library, science classrooms, and a sub- 
basement parking garage. Above the top 
floor is a false front with vertical openings, 
presumably screening mechanical systems, 
which gives the massive building a 
decorative touch. 

Historic Designation: 

None 


References: 

GWU Building Summary Sheet 


Map Identifier/Reference: 

NCPC 5771, A3 
Disk A. 6 




Architectural Survey of Properties in Foggy Bottom, W ashington, D.C. 

Prepared by HRS Greiner Woodward Clyde 
December 1999 



Name: 

New Hall 

Address: 

2350 H Street, NW 

Architect: 

Unknown 

Date of Construction: 

1996 

Campus ID: 

42-1 



Description: 

This new residence hall is built in a style 
reminiscent of the area’s historic apartment 
buildings. The 9-story H-shaped structure is 
faced with concrete on the first two stories 
with brick above. The concrete has been 
scored to resemble stone and is used 
throughout the design for decorative accents, 
as in the belt course, window lintels and 
sills, and comer decorations. The hall has 
yet to be named. 

Historic Designation: 

None 


References: 


Map Identifier/Reference: 

NCPC 5771, A3 
Disk A.7 




Architectural Survey of Properties in Foggy Bottom, \\ ashington. D.C. 

Prepared by URS Greiner Woodward Clyde 
December 1999 



Name : 

Western Presbyterian Church 

Add ress: 

2401 Virginia Avenue, NW 

Architect: 

Unknown 

Date of Construction: 

Unknown 

Campu s ID: 

N/A 



Descripti on: 

The Western Presbyterian Church is 
accessible by either its main entrance on 
Virginia Avenue or its side entrance facing 
24 lh Street (pictured here). The building 
houses a GWU campus ministry. The 
original church was expanded with an 
elaborately embellished brick wing on the 
24 lh Street side. This facade has diaperwork 
with red, orange, and dark brown brick 
making a pattern of interlocking Xs. 


Historic Designation: 

None 

References: 


Map Identifier/Reference: 

NCPC 5770, D3 
Disk A.8, 1.15 



Architectural Survey of Properties in Foggy Bottom, Washington, D.C. 

Prepared by URS Greiner Woodward Clyde 
December 1999 



Name: 

Odd Fellows Lodge No. 12 

Address: 

701 24 lh Street, NW 

Architect: 

Unknown 

Date of Construction: 

c. 1990 

Campus ID: 

N/A 



Description: 

This compact 2-story brick building is the 
Friendship Lodge No. 12 of the International 
Order of Odd Fellows, a national fraternal 
organization. This Postmodern building has 
a deeply set arched doorway, reminiscent of 
Richardsonian Romanesque architecture. 
Concrete banding runs along the basement 
level, above the windows, and as window 
sills. A wide arch with semicircular 
windows decorates the southern end of the 
facade. 

Historic Designatio n: 

None 


References: 


Map Ident ifier/R eference: 

NCPC 5771, D3 
Disk A. 9 




Architectural Survey of Properties in Foggy Bottom, W ashington, D.C. 

Prepared by URS Greiner Woodward Clyde 
December 1999 



Name: 

Charles E. Smith Center 

Address: 

600 22 nd Street, NW 

Architect: 

Unknown 

Date of Construction: 

1975 

Campus ID: 

57-1 



Descripti on: 

This large athletic complex was constructed 
in the early 1970s by Blake Construction 
Company. It is built of concrete with a tan 
brick veneer and concrete banding. 


Historic D esignation: 

None 


References: 


Map Identifier/Reference: 

NCPC 5770, D3 
Disk A. 10 




Architectural Survey of Properties in Foggy Bottom, W ashington, D.C. 

Prepared by URS Greiner Woodward Clyde 
December 1999 



Name: 

Funger Hall 

Address: 

2201 G Street, NW 

Architect: 

Faulkner, Stenhouse, Fryer, & Faulkner 

Date of Construct ion : 

1967-70 

Campus ID: 

56-1 



Description: 

This 7-story classroom facility is constructed 
of concrete with precast concrete exterior 
facings. These face blocks contain large 
pebble aggregate as a decorative element. 
The building is three bays wide with 
recessed windows divided vertically by thin 
concrete panels. It was originally called 
Building C and replaced residences and 
small businesses. 


Historic Designation: 

None 


References: 

GWU building Summary Sheet 


Map Identifier/Reference: 

NCPC 5770, D3 
Disk A. 11 



Architectural Survey of Properties in Foggy Bottom. W ashington, D.C. 

Prepared by URS Greiner Woodward Clyde 
December 1999 



Name: 

Tomkins Hall of Engineering 

Address: 

725 23 rd Street, NW 

Architect: 

Faulkner Kingsbury Stenhouse 

Date of Construction: 

1953 

Campus ID: 

56-2 



Description: 

This sleek 4-story building was designed in a 
Modeme style with decorative cutouts at the 
ends of the main faijade. It is faced with 
stone panels and possesses a granite, slightly 
projecting entrance. The windows are 
grouped in banks of four and are separated 
by hori/ontally-banded metal panels. 


Historic Designation: 

None 


References: 

GWU Building Summary Sheet 


Map Identifier/Reference: 

NCPC 5770, A3 
Disk A.12 




Architectural Survey of Properties in Foggy Bottom, Washington, D.C. 

Prepared by URS Greiner Woodward Clyde 
December 1999 



Name: 

St. Mary's Episcopal Church 
Address: 

730 23 rJ Street, NW 

Architect: 

Renwick, Aspinwall & Russell 

Date of Constr uction: 

1886-87 

Campus ID: 

N/A 



Map Identifier/Reference: 

NCPC 5770, A3 
Disk A. 13 


Descri ption: 

Built for Washington’s first African 
American Episcopal congregation, St. 

Mary’s was designed by James Renwick, Jr., 
best known for his design of the Smithsonian 
Castle. The church is made up of a complex 
containing the chapel, rectory, and 
classrooms arranged around a small garden. 
The building is brick with molded and 
pressed brick decorations. The church 
windows were manufactured in France and 
hand painted. 

Histo ric Designation: 

DC Landmark, 3/28/72 
National Register, 4/2/73 

R eferences: 

AIA Guide, p. 157 
Buildings of DC, p. 214 





Architectural Survey of Properties in Foggy Bottom, Washington, D.C. 

Prepared by URS Greiner Woodward Clyde 
December 1999 




Name: 

Fulbright Hall 
Ad dress: 

2223 H Street, NW 

Arc hitect: 

Unknown 

Date of Constructio n: 

1930s 

Campus ID: 

55-1 


Description: 

Fulbright Hall, named after Senator J. 
William Fulbright, graduate of GWU and 
founder of the prestigious Fulbright 
fellowship. The 8-story Hall was formerly 
the Everglades Apartments for Nurses. The 
Art Deco-inspired detailing includes, curved 
metal surrounding the recessed entrance and 
cast stone at the roofline with zigzag motifs 
and vertical banding. 


Historic Desig nation: 

None 


References: 


Map Identifier/Reference: 

NCPC 5771, A3 
Disk A. 15 







Architectural Survey of Properties in Foggy Bottom, Washington. D.C. 

Prepared by URS Greiner Woodward Clyde 
December 1999 



Name: 

Exercise Science Programs Building 


Address: 

817 23 rd Street, NW 

Architect: 

Unknown 

Date of Construction: 

c. 1930s 

Campus ID: 

55-2 



Descrip ti on : 

This low-profile square building houses the 
University’s original gymnasium. It is 
constructed of white brick, laid in Flemish 
bond. A large panel of glass blocks caps the 
slightly recessed door. Horizontal bands of 
projecting brick run along either side of the 
door. A blank medallion of cast stone is 
located at the center just under the roofline. 


Historic D esignation: 

None 


References: 


Map Identifier/Reference: 

NCPC 5771 , A3 
Disk A. 16 











Architectural Survey of Properties in Foggy Bottom, Washington. D.C. 

Prepared by URS Greiner Woodward Clyde 
December 1999 



Name: 

George Washington University Hospital 
Address: 

901 23 rd Street, NW 

Architect: 

Faulkner & Kingsbury 

Date of Construction: 

1945-48 

Additions in 1968, 1972, and 1974 


Camp u s ID: 

54-1 


Description: 

The expansive George Washington 



University Hospital is a landmark in the 
Foggy Bottom area. Constructed of concrete 
with a limestone veneer, the building rises 7 
stories high. In 1 968, the building was 
expanded along 23 rd Street and in 1972, the 
East Wing was built, both designed by the 
original architects. The Duncan Pavilion and 
Southwest Wing were added in 1974 by 
Faulkner, Fryer, and Vanderpool. 

Historic Designation: 

None 


References: 

GWU Building Summary Sheet 


Map Identifier/Reference: 

NCPC 5771, A3 
Disk A. 17 



Architectural Survey of Properties in Foggy Bottom, W ashington, D.C. 

Prepared by URS Greiner Woodward Clyde 
December 1999 



Name: 

Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis Hall 
Address: 

2222 Eye Street, NW 

Architect: 

Unknown 

Date o ^Construction: 

Unknown 

Campus ID: 

55-3 


Description: 

Formerly the Milton Apartments, Kennedy 
Onassis Hall is named for the former First 
Lady, who graduated from the University in 
1951. This 8-story 2-bay building is faced 
with yellow brick and closely matches 
Munson Hall, immediately adjacent to it. 
The space between the bays is recessed and 
contains the entrance. Decorative motifs 
include cast stone scrollwork over the door 
and surrounding the first floor and eighth 
floor windows. Three medallions decorate 
each bay along a horizontal cast stone band 
above the sixth floor. 

Historic Designatio n: 

None 

References: 


Map Identifier/Reference: 

NCPC 5771, A3 
Disk A. 18 






Architectural Survey of Properties in Foggy Bottom, Washington, D.C. 

Prepared by URS Greiner Woodward Clyde 
December 1999 



Name: 

Munson Hall 

Address : 

22 1 2 Eye Street, NW 

Architect : 

Unknown 

Date of Construction: 

Unknown 

Campus ID : 

55-4 

Description : 

Formerly the Munson Apartment, this 8-story 
building was converted to a dormitory in 
1970. It is very similar in style and form to 
its next door neighbor, Kennedy Onassis 
Hall. The fenestration pattern and material 
choices are the same, yellow brick w'ith cast 
stone detailing, but the details themselves are 
different. Munson Hall has one slightly 
projecting center bay with a recessed 
entrance with vertical cast stone banding. 
Three medallions decorate the entrance 
along with two panels with decorative 
scrollwork. 

Historic Designation: 

None 

References: 


Map Identifier/Reference: 

NCPC 5771, A3 
Disk A. 19 





Architectural Survey of Properties in Foggy Bottom, Washington, D.C. 

Prepared by URS Greiner Woodward Clyde 
December 1999 




Name: 

Row House 

Address: 

837 22 nd Street, NW 

Architect: 

Unknown 

Date of Construction: 

c. 1885 

Campus ID: 

N/A 

Description: 

This solitary residence is all that remains of a 
former row of houses along 22 nd Street. The 
structure is brick with many decorative 
elements. Molded brick with raised dots 
adorn the arches over the windows and door. 
An off-center projecting bay is decorated 
with chamfered corners. A metal fence, 
possibly historic, surrounds the property. 


Historic Designation: 

None 


References: 


Map Identifier /Reference: 

NCPC 5771, A4 
Disk B. 1 





Architectural Surv ey of Properties in Foggy Bottom, Washington, D.C. 

Prepared by URS Greiner Woodward Clyde 
December 1999 




Name: 

The President Apartments 
Address: 

2141 Eye Street, NW 

Architect: 

Unknown 

Date of Construction: 

c. 1960s 

Campus ID: 

N/A 

Description: 

This 8-story modern apartment is faced with 
tan brick. It has two projecting square bays 
and windows flush with the exterior wall 
surface . 


Historic Designation: 

None 


References: 


NCPC 5771, A3 
Disk B.2 


Map Identifier/Reference: 






Architectural Survey of Properties in Foggy Bottom, Washington, D.C. 

Prepared by URS Greiner Woodward Clyde 
December 1999 



Name: 

Benjamin T. Rome Hall 

Address: 

801 22 nd Street, NW 

Architect: 

Unknown 

Date of Construction: 

c. 1980-82 

Campus ID: 

77-10 



Description: 

Rome Hall is part of the Academic Center, 
one of the largest buildings on campus. This 
massive. 7-story tall brick and glass- 
sheathed structure dominates the streetscape. 


Historic Designation: 

None 


References: 


Map Identifier/Reference: 

NCPC 5771, A4 
Disk B.3 



Architectural Surv ey of Properties in Foggy Bottom, Washington, D.C. 

Prepared by URS Greiner Woodward Clyde 
December 1999 



Name: 

John Quincy Adams House 

Address: 

2129 Eye Street, NW 

Architect: 

Unknown 

Date of Construction: 

Late 1 9* century 

Campus ID: 

75-12 



Description: 

The John Quincy Adams House, along with 
the two row houses to the north, are 
representative of GW’s reuse of vernacular 
architecture found throughout the Foggy 
Bottom area. The Adams House, now the 
Development Office, is constructed of brown 
brick with a red tile roof and decorative 
molded brick detailing. Diamond 
decorations separate the first and second 
floors and an elaborate corbelled brick 
cornice caps the structure. 

Historic Designation: 

References: 


Map Identifier/Reference: 

NCPC 5771, A4 
Disk B.4 





Architectural Survey of Properties in Foggy Bottom, Washington, D.C. 

Prepared by URS Greiner Woodward Clyde 
December 1999 



Name: 

The West End Apartments 

Address: 

2124 Eye Street, NW 

Architect: 

Unknown 

Date of Construction: 

1920s- 1930s 

Campus ID: 

N/A 



Description: 

This 8-story apartment building is faced 
with brown brick with concrete detailing 
The cornice contains a frieze and dentil 
course. A belt course runs above the 
second floor. The classicist entrance is 
surrounded by pilasters and a full 
entablature. The West End is similar to 
many of the 20 th century apartment 
buildings found on and around the GW 
campus. 

Historic Designation: 

None 

References: 


Map Identifier/Reference: 

NCPC 5771, A4 
Disk B.5 



Architectural Surv ey of Properties in Foggy Bottom, Washington, D.C. 

Prepared by URS Greiner Woodward Clyde 
December 1999 



Name: 

Marquis de Lafayette Hall 

Address: 

2100 Eye Street, NW 

Architect: 

Unknown 

Date of Construction: 

1920s-1930s 

Campus ID: 

77-5 

Description: 

This 8-story tall former apartment building 
was converted to dormitory use in the 1960s. 
It has an elaborate overhanging cornice with 
dentils and a belt course with a full frieze 
and dentil course over the second floor. The 
third story windows are marked by cast stone 
semicircular panels with a fan motif. The 
second story windows are surmounted by 
shell shapes in cast stone. 


Historic Designation: 

None 


References: 


Map Identifier/Reference: 

NCPC 5771, A4 
Disk B.6 



Architectural Surv ey of Properties in Foggy Bottom, Washington, D.C. 

Prepared by URS Greiner Woodward Clyde 
December 1999 



Name: 

Park 

Address: 

Bounded by 21 s1 and Eye Streets, 
Pennsylvania Avenue 

Architect: 

N/A 

Date of Construction: 

Unknown 


Campus ID: 

N/A 



Description: 

This triangular shaped park is bounded on 
the north by Pennsylvania Avenue, on the 
west by 2 1 st Street, and on the south by Eye 
Street. Located across from Red Lion Row, 
it serves as a visual and physical buffer 
between the campus and the surrounding 
area. This designed open space, with 
benches and paths, separates the academic 
environment of the University from the 
Central Business District that extends down 
Pennsylvania Avenue. 

Historic Designation: 

None 

References: 


Map Identifier/Reference: 

NCPC 5771, A4 
Disk B.7 



Architectural Surv ey of Properties in Foggy Bottom, Washington, D.C. 

Prepared by URS Greiner Woodward Clyde 
December 1999 




Buildings of DC, p. 215 
Map Identifier/Reference: 

NCPC 5771, A5 
Disk B.8, 9 


Name: 

Stockton Hall/National Law Center 
Address: 

720 20 ,h Street, NW 

Architect: 

Albert L. Harris and Arthur B. Heaton 

Date of Construction: 

1924-1925 

Campus ID: 

102-5 

Description: 

Stockton Hall, the school’s first law 
building, is now part of the University’s 
National Law Center, joined with Lemer 
Hall and Bums Law Library. Stockton Hall 
is part of the original campus quad between 
20 lh and 2 1 st , G and H Streets. Its sister 
building, designed simultaneously, is 
Corcoran Hall located across the quad. The 
Colonial Revival style was popular for 
academic institutions and here is evidenced 
by a simplicity of form, modest decoration, 
brick facing, and a central cupola on the 
roof. 

Historic Designation: 

DC Landmark, 11/18/87 
National Register, 9/13/91 

References: 





Architectural Surv ey of Properties in Foggy Bottom, Washington, D.C. 

Prepared by URS Greiner Woodward Clyde 
December 1999 



Name: 

Jacob Bums Law Library /National Law 
Center 

Address: 

718 20th Street, NW 

Architect: 

Mills Petticord & Mills (1970) 

Keyes Condon Florance (1984 addition) 

Date of Construction: 

1970, 1984 


Campus ID: 

102-6 



Description: 

Bums Law Library was joined with Stockton 
Hall and later Lerner Hall to create the 
University’s National Law Center. It is a 
reinforced concrete structure with detailing 
that evokes the historic architecture of its 
surroundings. Brick arches and parapets 
with steeply sloped gabled roofs remind 
passers-by of the residential history of the 
Foggy Bottom neighborhood. 

Historic Designation: 

None 


References: 

AIA Guide, p. 157 
Buildings of DC, p. 215 


Map Identifier/Reference: 

NCPC 5771, D5 
Disk B. 10, 11